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Comment: Re:Coal power cars make little sense (Score 1) 257

by gtbritishskull (#49068923) Attached to: Tesla Factory Racing To Retool For New Models
I was just commenting on your incorrect view on physics. Yes, torque alone does not matter. The number that does matter is the 0-60, which was 3.2 seconds (for the P85D), 5.9 seconds (for 2012 base) or 5.4 (for the 2013 base). But, according to you that also does not matter. That the only thing that matters is the range. You move from one argument to another, and whenever one argument gets shot down you try another. You are biased against the car (or, more likely, electrics in general) and no matter what I say you will find something else to hate. I could bring up the supercharger network which is being constantly expanded. Or that most people drive less than 30 miles per day. But, you would just move on to your next argument, probably saying that they rank at the bottom because they don't have a trailer hitch. I am done feeding the trolls.

Comment: Re:Coal power cars make little sense (Score 1) 257

by gtbritishskull (#49067405) Attached to: Tesla Factory Racing To Retool For New Models
From reading your comments, I am about 50% sure that you are a troll, but I can't let a comment with such terrible physics interpretation stand without a response. Torque is a force. Force is not energy. Energy comes from work. Work is force times distance. So, you can have as much torque as you want, but if it is not moving no energy is being expended. To follow your tree example, the branches on the tree support enormous torque. But, they are not moving so do not produce energy. I would respond to your other points, but honestly didn't think it would be worthwhile trying to understand what you were saying after I realized you have zero grasp of physics.

Comment: Re:inb4 (Score 2, Interesting) 638

by gtbritishskull (#45280115) Attached to: Drive With Google Glass: Get a Ticket
But, it seems that a low of people are arguing that Glass should be illegal to wear while driving. Is it better to have to look down at your dash to view your navigation than to have it displayed in the corner of your vision? Or, is the argument that it CAN be used improperly (watching youtube, facebook, etc.) so it should be illegal? If that is the argument, then we should ban all guns because they can be used improperly (to kill innocent people).

Comment: Re:Small economics (Score 1) 242

by gtbritishskull (#44543403) Attached to: Looking Beyond Corn and Sugarcane For Cost-Effective Biofuels
Ethanol from sugarcane has an 8:1 energy balance (8 units of energy out for every 1 unit of energy put in). Ethanol from corn was below or less than 1:1, but I think it now has a (barely) positive energy balance due to advances in technology and economies of scale. I think I read that biodiesel was between 2 and 3, but I am sure that depends on what plant you are getting the oil from.

Comment: Re:I find it hilarious... (Score 1) 452

by gtbritishskull (#44319979) Attached to: Tesla Motors May Be Having an iPhone Moment
Oil can be used to make electricity. So can coal, natural gas, sunlight, biomass, flowing water, and wind. When was the last time you saw a wind powered car driving down the road (though this one is pretty neat). Or a coal powered car? Nuclear powered? We do have natural gas powered vehicles, but how difficult would it be for you to use it in your car? We have a glut in natural gas right now, and it provides about 30% of our power. So, those Tesla owners are (on average) powering 30% of their car on natural gas (made in the USA), and the rest on coal, nuclear, or the others I mentioned above (all made in the USA). So, you go ahead and keep financing terrorists and the countries that support them by propping up oil prices. And you can also keep threatening our national security by keeping us reliant on other countries for our energy. I will get an electric car. And I will be confident in my ability to use it regardless of who we go to war with because it uses the most flexible fuel source... all of them.

Comment: Re:Abusing their monopoly power (Score 2) 383

by gtbritishskull (#44240387) Attached to: Judge Rules Apple Colluded With Publishers to Fix Ebook Prices

From Wikipedia, Groupthink is a psychological phenomenon that occurs within a group of people, in which the desire for harmony or conformity in the group results in an incorrect or deviant decision-making outcome. So, the fact that a group of people can result in deviant outcomes that would not result from the individuals alone seems to indicate that a "group" (or company) can be evil (or more evil) while the individuals may not be (or be less evil).

Comment: Re:Who Cares? (Score 2) 1448

The anti-gay factions were the ones who got the Fed into it. They passed DOMA which specifically said that the federal government would not recognize gay marriage which was legal in the state. If the Fed were staying out of it, they would have recognized any marriage which the state recognized (this is how it traditionally worked - the states defined marriage).

Comment: Re:Gas (Score 1) 377

by gtbritishskull (#44070967) Attached to: Tesla To Build Its Own Battery-Swap Stations

Top tier gas has a higher octane rating (Premium is usually 93, Mid-grade is usually 91, Regular is 89), which means that it requires higher temperatures and pressures to spontaneously combust (spontaneous combustion is bad for engines and results in the "knock" sound). While you might be correct that the gas does not actually have any more octane in it (ethanol increases the octane rating), you are wrong in saying that octane has nothing to do with top tier gas.

Also, as a sidenote, refineries do not actually produce midgrade gasoline. Midgrade is just a mixture of premium and regular gasoline.

Comment: Re:Gas (Score 1) 377

by gtbritishskull (#44070923) Attached to: Tesla To Build Its Own Battery-Swap Stations

High octane-rated fuel does not spontaneously combust (or actually requires higher temperatures and pressures to spontaneously combust). Spontaneous combustion means all the fuel (essentially) ignites at once, which causes the "knock" sound. Instead, you want the fuel to ignite sequentially. How this happens in a gasoline engine is that the spark from the spark plug ignites some fuel and the flame front travels out from that point throughout the cylinder. So, while it is true that you do want slower combustion, the higher octane rated fuel does not actually burn slower than lower octane rated fuel. You are just trying to prevent the fuel from burning real quickly (spontaneous combustion).

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