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Comment: Re:Thank you - just PR for his presidential run. (Score 5, Interesting) 360

by funwithBSD (#49747671) Attached to: What Was the Effect of Rand Paul's 10-Hour "Filibuster"?

Here is why:

One: He is forcing the cloture vote on this to be next week, there is not time (its complicated) for the cloture vote to happen before the NSA must shut down the program.
Other business, like the pending trade agreement will have to be dealt with to come back to the NSA.
So for at least one weekend, there will be no NSA spying, and they will have to get it back on line if and when it is reauthorized. Inertia is our friend, if it is down, there will be pressure to keep it down.

Two: He also prevented it from passing cloture by unanimous consent, which is really silence. The chair asks a variation of "Without objection, so ordered" and if everyone is silent, it passes. There are no up/down votes, so no up/down vote is recorded

Now people are going to vote yea or nay, and THAT will be on the record for the next election.

Comment: Re:Its funny (Score 1) 214

Then you have read neither.

There is no comparison between the two in terms of violence. The Qu'ran is in part a history of the early conquests and has over a hundred verses about smiting the unbelievers.

While there is some "smite the unbelievers" in the Bible, it is limited to the Old Testament... which was not written by Christians, but is there to support the claim of Christ being the one prophesied in the Old Testament.

The new Testament, contains no such verses justifying the killing of unbelievers by Christians.

Smiting by the hand of God? Sure, but not by members of the religion.

Comment: Re:Three skills (not exactly tech skills) (Score 1) 298

by funwithBSD (#49729805) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Skills Do HS Students Need To Know Now?

Not exactly true.

My "writing" skills were derived from traditional methods, i.e. prose, storytelling, etc. (a lot from playing MMORPGS =) ).

Most people comment on how easy my writing is to follow, how I tell a story about the technology and not just the details, that it is even occasionally entertaining.

A Distinguished Engineer here at IBM that I do some work for called my writing style as "Very personable"

Considering most of my work for him is when things have gone all pear shaped and I am reporting on what we did to fix it, it is probably a good thing. =)

Comment: Re:Three skills (not exactly tech skills) (Score 1) 298

by funwithBSD (#49729687) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Skills Do HS Students Need To Know Now?

As my mentor at IBM points out:

He who writes the paper gets the credit.

If you write up the solution, process, procedure, results, etc, when people want to know what happened, they will come to you first, even though the whole team is credited.

Talk up the teammates, make sure they get credit too, don't be a dick.
But I assure you that you will be noticed and it will be your name attached to the project.

Same with meetings. Set them up, chair them if necessary, or turn it over to someone who will. Either way, you are seen as "owning" the meeting.
Extra credit: write up the minutes and publish them.

Again, you are not taking credit, just taking the initiative and being helpful. That goes a long way in any situation.

Comment: Re:Typing (Score 1) 298

by funwithBSD (#49729553) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Skills Do HS Students Need To Know Now?

Back in the late 80's I went to a presentation by Douglas Englebart.

Being a 16 year old smartass whippersnapper I asked him a question: "What will replace the mouse and the keyboard?"

He was stumped. I thought I was hot shit for stumping him...

but here I am 30 years later and I am still using a mouse and a keyboard to interact with a computer, and it is still the most efficient way to do so.

There's no such thing as a free lunch. -- Milton Friendman

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