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Comment: Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (Score 1) 466

And yet, AT&T wants more money because they think they have the right to charge Netflix more to pass through their tollbooth.

- it's not their 'tollbooth', it's their road. On a road you can charge different rates for different types of vehicles, this is the same situation. An eighteen wheeler can cause more damage to the road that requires more maintenance than a motorcycle, this is the same thing: a movie that needs to be streamed a million times takes up much more capacity and energy and basically uses the system much more than millions of small individual requests do.

See, I even used an appropriate car analogy.

OK, so this is AT&T's road. HOWEVER, it's customers are paying to drive whatever vehicle they want on that road. Sure, you've got millions of request from Netflix to stream a movie, but you have millions of end users paying AT&T to be able to do that. I'm on Time Warner's Roadrunner. I pay them every month to use their networks however I see fit, and there is no exemption in that agreement regarding what that content is. So why should Netflix have to pay, too? TW has already been paid once for that bandwidth.

Comment: Re:I don't see need for 1Gps either (Score 1) 338

by frozentier (#46065135) Attached to: Google Fiber Launches In Provo — and Here's What It Feels Like

If we had proper (bi-directional) home internet connections we wouldn't need large storage devices with us and could simply remotely access our files from home whenever we want to listen to music or transfer a report we've been working on for work/school/etc.

You have NO IDEA how much more dangerous that could potentially be than storing them at a third party site.

Comment: Re:Use the other less popular limb (Score 1) 481

by frozentier (#44919487) Attached to: CCC Says Apple iPhone 5S TouchID Broken

Fingerprints are left behind all the time so it would be trivial for someone to obtain.

That depends on the situation. If you find a phone lying on a bus seat and decide you're keeping it, then unless you lift the print from the phone itself you are just shit out of luck. If you don't even know who the phone belongs to, you're not going to be able to get a print. Also if you steal a phone, say out of a woman's open purse, you aren't going to be able to get prints from anywhere other than the phone, either. What are you going to do, find out where she lives, break into her house, find a dirty glass and lift a print from it? It's not like people are going to keep government secrets on their phone. If you do, you're dumb as a box of bricks. Phone security is there to keep credit card numbers from casual thieves in the event that you lose your phone. If the cops or the government have you in custody and are trying to get into your phone, you've got much bigger things to worry about.

Power corrupts. And atomic power corrupts atomically.

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