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Comment: Re:News for Nerds? (Score 1, Insightful) 270

by flatt (#47125181) Attached to: Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion

You might be shocked to find out, despite the stereotype, that a large number of nerds are interested in professional sports as well. When an important figure in technology buys a sports team, it is a newsworthy item. Otherwise, feel free to ignore stories that you personally don't find interesting going forward.

Comment: MT already is a favorite place for the wealthy too (Score 1) 164

by Facekhan (#46922157) Attached to: Is Montana the Next Big Data Hub?

The Big Sky area of Montana is already full of vacation homes and ranches of wealthy VC types so its not a big stretch that they might choose to plop a Data Center there. Still I think it is far more likely that you will see more data centers copping up in SLC because of the NSA. All the big government contractors will be putting boots on the ground in SLC and they can't co-locate at the NSA facility.

SF, NYC, and DC are just so expensive.

Government

CIA Accused: Sen. Feinstein Sees Torture Probe Meddling 187

Posted by timothy
from the taking-the-heat-off-that-other-agency dept.
SternisheFan writes with this news from the Washington Post: "In an extraordinary public accusation, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee declared on Tuesday that the CIA interfered with and then tried to intimidate a congressional investigation into the agency's possible use of torture in terror probes during the Bush administration. The CIA clandestinely removed documents and searched a computer network set up for lawmakers, said Sen. Dianne Feinstein in a long and biting speech on the Senate floor. In an escalating dispute with an agency she has long supported, she said the CIA may well have violated criminal laws and the U.S. Constitution."

Comment: Lousy argument (Score 1) 235

It would seem like the victim can consent to the location tracking of her stolen cell phone. No warrant necessary or certainly an easily obtained one.

Now if they tracked the perpetrators cell phone, that would require a warrant under SCOTUS rulings I've seen.

I don't think a civil NDA between the state and a government contractor has any power over a criminal case and it certainly does not override the 4th amendment.

Comment: Re:Not in my experience (Score 1) 373

by flatt (#44512779) Attached to: Hybrid Hard Drives Just Need 8GB of NAND

I too have the Seagate Momentus XT 750 GB which is the second generation of these Seagate drives (the article being about the new third generation which teams 8GB NAND with 5400RPM drives while these were 8GB NAND with 7200RPM). My experience was apparently very different from yours. In fact, I was so impressed by the performance of it in my laptop, I bought a second drive for an aging desktop to use as an HTPC when it came up on sale.

Few people who are interested in these drives expect them to be stand-in replacements for true SSDs but the performance increase over a standard rotational drive can be huge while the cost difference is marginal. Sure SSD prices are dropping but seriously, how much did you pay for the Samsung 750 GB SSD? Right now, most SSDs in this storage range are still typically in the neighborhood of $800-$1000 while this particular drive has been somewhere in the neighborhood of $110-$150 for the last year or so. Of course there's going to be a performance difference. But if the bulk of the os/applications that you work with can live in the 8GB provided (which is true for most folks), these can be a godsend at this price point. On the other hand, if you work with large amounts of data in an inconsistent fashion, you're unlikely to see the benefits.

I do question Seagate's determination that 8GB "ought to be enough for anybody" but it does hit a sweet-spot for most people at this time (definitely not future-facing). My biggest beef was that we were promised NAND-based write caching in a firmware update (supposedly in early 2012!) with this drive that was never delivered and that alone may be enough to stop me from buying Seagate in the future. This write caching has been implemented on this new generation and it will be interesting to see the real-world performance (especially given the 5400RPM rotational backing it).

Comment: Re:Yes (Score 4, Interesting) 533

Killing 3 people and maiming 234 using explosives and shrapnel counts as mass destruction in my book. Thanks for asking, though.

Then charge him with three counts of murder and 234 counts of attempted murder. Does it really matter that this was done with explosives? Would you feel better if he stabbed 237 people to the same effect?

Comment: Re:Golf Clap (Score 1) 105

by flatt (#43862227) Attached to: California Bill Would Mandate Open Access To Publicly Funded Research

True. Researchers (or more correctly, organizations that hire researchers) will just try to get funding in every other state first (where they can have their cake and eat it too) and then come to California. If they find it elsewhere, they will leave. Eventually, the type of research that will be done in CA will be self-selected in that there were no issues with open access to begin with. Perhaps this is acceptable, I don't know.

Firefox

Firefox 21 Arrives 246

Posted by Soulskill
from the can-now-legally-drink dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Mozilla on Tuesday officially launched Firefox 21 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Improvements include the addition of multiple social providers on the desktop as well as open source fonts on Android. In the changelog, the company included an interesting point that's worth elaborating on: 'Preliminary implementation of Firefox Health Report.' Mozilla has revealed that FHR so far logs 'basic health information' about Firefox: time to start up, total running time, and number of crashes. Mozilla says the initial report is pretty simple but will grow 'in the coming months.' You can get it now from Mozilla."

I took a fish head to the movies and I didn't have to pay. -- Fish Heads, Saturday Night Live, 1977.

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