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Comment: Re:Leave then (Score 1) 838

by fgouget (#49344707) Attached to: Gen Con Threatens To Leave Indianapolis Over Religious Freedom Bill

Then there are things which you CAN discriminate on.

If you don't like who a business [...] refuses service to, you are free to take your business elsewhere and share your views with your friends, neighbors or even the random person on the street if they will listen.

Let the market decide and if the majority of people think like you and take their business some other place, so be it. Just live your life and do your business and let others do the same. Seems like freedom to me.

Wonderful community you want to build. One where minorities can be ostracised, denied service by the majority, forced to either supply themselves from shaddy sources who will overchage them or to die or leave if they can. Members of that holier than thou majority can try to hide behind the veil of religious mores all they want. The truth is it is they who don't have one shred of morality.

Comment: Re:A few fairly obvious things (Score 1) 160

by fgouget (#49334705) Attached to: Energy Company Trials Computer Servers To Heat Homes

3. [...]no moving parts. SSD for boot,

As far as I can tell this is speculation on your part. Past a certain weight people are not going to throw the box around. As a heater it's also quite possible that it will be fastened to a wall or something too. Not that it matters anyway.

3. The article says that the supplier supplies power. Whatever cable they use for that can easily have a fibre built in for data.

That however is totally unrealistic. First they say they'll pay for power, not that they will lay their own electric cable all the way to the customer to bring power. That would be incredibly stupid, wasteful and so expensive they would never get a positive return on investment. So they will at most install a separate electric meter at the customer's premises, and then hook up their machine to a regular power outlet. So then this fiber you want to put in the power cable will have nowhere to plug into. And again, given that most houses/apartments don't have fiber yet it, requiring a fiber connection would limit them to just a fraction of the potential market, or would force them to lay their own fiber which again is incredibly expensive (but at least it would not be redundant if they manage to resell it to regular ISPs). But it's more likely they will simply reuse their customer's Internet connection (remember data caps are mostly a US thing). So really what this tells us is that they will limit themselves to workloads which don't require too much communication. The ideal case would be CPU/GPU intensive computations like Folding@Home, SETI, GIMPS, etc.

Comment: Re:Yes they have studied all that stuff (Score 1) 262

by fgouget (#49251369) Attached to: US Wind Power Is Expected To Double In the Next 5 Years

There is no energy shortage.

I think you meant to say there is no power shortage. However we only have 56 years of proven reserves of oil, add another 4 years counting oil sands. To me that qualifies as a looming shortage of one of our primary source of energy. And that's all assuming zero increase in energy use, and as a corollary that about 85% of the population keeps on using 5 to 10 times less energy per person than Americans. So saying there's no energy shortage is a bit optimistic.

That said I'll grant you that although we only have 58 years of proven natural gas reserves, at least discoveries seem to be keeping pace. We'll see how that goes once the oil runs out however. Also while we can switch to other energy sources like wind and solar, they require an important initial investment of energy which will be hard once we start feeling the crunch.

Climate change is due to pollution, not overpopulation.

That's disingenuous when it's caused by a byproduct of our main sources of energy. CO2 is not something you can filter out of your car exhaust or that we can easily take out of power plants.

Comment: Re:Care to volunteer? (Score 1) 262

by fgouget (#49250975) Attached to: US Wind Power Is Expected To Double In the Next 5 Years

So you think we need to get rid of 6 out of every 7 people. Will you be first in line?

No. He's saying that whether we want it or not the world population will go down to 1 billion, either in an orderly fashion of our own choosing; or through famine, disease and war over resources.

While I don't agree with his 1 billion mark, it's obvious the population cannot increase indefinitely. Fortunately it's expected that it will plateau at or before the 10 billion mark. But there's still the question of whether there's enough resources (energy, drinking water, ores, etc) to sustain a population of 10 billion, all living decent lives (unlike now), indefinitely.

Comment: Re:Has anyone studied? (Score 1) 262

by fgouget (#49250833) Attached to: US Wind Power Is Expected To Double In the Next 5 Years

Mod this up! I've been asking the same questions for years now and still haven't seen any answers. I've also come to the same conclusions as AC.

Studies are not hard to find: type 'weather impact of wind turbines' in Google and the first link will be Wikipedia which will point you to five studies on the subject!

To summarize the current set of studies don't find a significant impact but more detailed analyzes will tell us more. But we've been building sky-scrapers and other tall structures for a century now and have yet to see any impact of these. Also wind-turbines are about 150 meters high when our atmosphere is 20,000 meters thick. Finally taking down wind-turbines is much easier than scrubbing CO2 from the atmosphere. So overall I have a hard time feeling concerned.

Comment: Re:Has anyone studied? (Score 1) 262

by fgouget (#49250725) Attached to: US Wind Power Is Expected To Double In the Next 5 Years

Today the planet will generate 6,000 calories for everyone on the planet. You need 2,000, so *using today's agriculture* we could support 21 billion people.

You're forgetting all the the food that is thrown away by producers and then supermarkets because it would not sell, then all the food people buy and let go bad, and then all that they put in their plate and then throw away because they're full. So to get this 2000 calories intake farmers need to produce at least 4000. But probably you think that solving this issue is trivial.

However, a considerable amount of currently used land is used extremely inefficiently.

A no less considerable amount does not lend itself to standard agricultural practices either because of the terrain or the lack of water for irrigation. The 'efficient land use' also relies on a massive use of fossil fuel based fertilizers. But you probably think we have an inexhaustible supply of fossil fuels.

And of course the system as a whole is unbelievably inefficient because we have a meat-heavy diet. [...] And even our choice of meat is terrible; beef is far, far less efficient to produce than chicken.

Sure. Convincing everyone to stop eating beef, let alone most forms of meat, is totally realistic. And having to go down this path is absolutely not the sign that there's more people than the earth can support given our current lifestyle.

And since food costs for the average Canadian have dropped from 40% of their take-home pay to under 9% [...] we clearly have significant amounts of money we could use to pay for it,

Great! 0.5% of the population can afford increased food costs! Even if we ignore disparities among their populations and extend your reasoning to all developed countries we end up with at most a billion people. Do you even care about the remaining 85%?

So maybe the earth can sustain 7 billion people but all your arguments are naive and totally off the mark.

Comment: Re:From SIM to Chip and PIN (Score 1) 155

by fgouget (#49118343) Attached to: NSA, GHCQ Implicated In SIM Encryption Hack

I have been wondering about Stingrays too. Based on the Stingrays Wikipedia page they would not need access to the SIM card's private key. Instead they force the device to use the weaker A5/2 security protocol and then crack it which allows them to recover the SIM card's private key.

The "GSM Active Key Extraction" performed by the StingRay in step three merits additional explanation. A GSM phone encrypts all communications content using an encryption key stored on its SIM card with a copy stored at the service provider. While simulating the target device during the above explained man-in-the-middle attack, the service provider cell site will ask the StingRay (which it believes to be the target device) to initiate encryption using the key stored on the target device. Therefore, the StingRay needs a method to obtain the target device's stored encryption key else the man-in-the-middle attack will fail.

GSM primarily encrypts communications content using the A5/1 call encryption cypher. In 2008 it was reported that a GSM phone's encryption key can be obtained using $1,000 worth of computer hardware and 30 minutes of cryptanalysis performed on signals encrypted using A5/1. However, GSM also supports an export weakened variant of A5/1 called A5/2. This weaker encryption cypher can be cracked in real-time. While A5/1 and A5/2 use different cypher strengths, they each utilize the same underlying encryption key stored on the SIM card. Therefore, the StingRay performs "GSM Active Key Extraction" during step three of the man-in-the-middle attack as follows: (1) instruct target device to use the weaker A5/2 encryption cypher, (2) collect A5/2 encrypted signals from target device, and (3) perform cryptanalysis of the A5/2 signals to quickly recover the underlying stored encryption key. Once the encryption key is obtained, the StingRay uses it to comply with the encryption request made to it by the service provider during the man-in-the-middle attack.

This perfectly illustrates why allowing protocol variants with weaker security is a bad idea. It also makes Gemalto's security lapse look somewhat irrelevant: cracking the SIM's private key seems pretty trivial anyway.

Comment: Re:Fallout? (Score 1) 155

by fgouget (#49118237) Attached to: NSA, GHCQ Implicated In SIM Encryption Hack

with the vital secrets either stored a lot more carefully, or, ideally, generated on-SIM and never leaving the SIM during its operational life, short of a direct silicon-level attack.

My understanding is that's what they do already. The private key is generated and put directly into the SIM card and never leaves it. But a private key is useless if nobody knows the corresponding public key. It's the transfer of that public key to the entity that needs it, the carrier, that the NSA/GCHQ intercepted.

Maybe a fix would be for Gemalto to sell blank SIM cards and have the carriers themselves generate and burn the private key to it using a software WORN API: Write Once, Read Never. Of course then the NSA/GCHQ would have no trouble forcing the US carriers to hand over all their public keys but then they can already force them to intercept the communications. At least the rest of the world would only be subject spying by their own government.

Comment: Titi username (Score 1) 65

by fgouget (#49086819) Attached to: 'Babar' Malware Attributed To France

The report says "Titi is a French diminutive for Thiery, or a colloquial term for a small person".

Well first it's Thierry with two 'r's, but I've never seen titi being used as a diminutive for it, though that's because nobody would stand to it being used in public. Then there's the titi parisien but I've never seen titi referring to a small person.

But all this misses the point. Just like an uninspired English-speaking programmer will call his variable 'foo' and then 'bar' if he needs a second one, a French programmer will call his variable 'toto' (from the classic Toto jokes) and then 'titi' if he needs a second one (and then 'tata' but normally by the time he reaches tutu he realizes he really needs to straighten up ;-) ).

So what this really tells us is that this developer has a collegue whose username is 'toto'.

Comment: Titi username (Score 1) 353

by fgouget (#49086793) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Most Useful Browser Extensions?
The report says "Titi is a French diminutive for Thiery, or a colloquial term for a small person".

Well first it's Thierry with two 'r's, but I've never seen titi being used as a diminutive for it, though that's because nobody would stand to it being used in public. Then there's the titi parisien but I've never seen titi refering to a small person.

But all this misses the point. Just like an uninspired English-speaking programmer will call his variable 'foo' and then 'bar' if he needs a second one, a French programmer will call his variable 'toto' (from the classic Toto jokes) and then 'titi' if he needs a second one (and then 'tata' but normally by the time he reaches tutu he realizes he really needs to straighten up ;-) ).

So what this really tells us is that this developer has a collegue whose username is 'toto'.

Comment: Re:Isn't slashdot's reaction interesting... (Score 1) 65

by fgouget (#49086677) Attached to: 'Babar' Malware Attributed To France

This proves that all the whining about the NSA has little to do with actual worries (as if anyone in the government actually cares about their porn viewing habits), and more to do with overwrought anti-Americanism.

Quite the opposite. It proves that the anti-French sentiment is so strong in the US and UK that it drowns any rational discussion.

Comment: Re:Lawsuits coming? (Score 1) 418

ISP: Internet Service Provider. They connect your machine to the internet. WTF do you think server hosting companies do, you nitwit?

Server hosting companies certainly do not connect my machine to the Internet: they provide Internet hosting services and not Internet Access. And if you're going to use the ISP acronym in another discussion you should know that it commonly exclusively refers to Internet access providers. But it sure is a great way to spread FUD and claim plausible deniability.

Comment: Re:Lawsuits coming? (Score 1) 418

I don't think it makes any noticable difference but that was not the point I was trying to make. If they can show a measurable difference

And again you miss the point: no matter what equipment you use you will not be able to detect any difference in sound quality between their cable and a regular cable.

It's even obvious without any testing to anyone who knows anything about the Ethernet, TCP/IP or the OSI model: either a packet of data makes it across the cable or it does not. If it does, then it's going to be bit for bit identical no matter what cable you used, and thus the resulting sound will be identical too. If the packet did not get across, then it means you god a broken cable or some rodent has been chomping on it. But the result will either be a retransmission in time, in which case there will again be no impact on the sound quality, and if not, a pop, stall or stutter. But you will under no circumstances get a reduced "sound picture", lesser "differentiation between sonic elements" or lesser "sense of clarity".

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