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Comment Nethack! (Score 1) 462

I've played Nethack for countless hours over the years and always return to it. I've ascended about 5 times, i think. Every time I come back to it, i fall in love with it all over again.

I can't think of another game that has affected me like that

Comment Agreed. (Score 1) 292

and the interesting (ironic?) thing is that the kinds of people that actually WANT to do this type of video streaming are the exact type of people that WON'T put up with DRM. I want to watch the vid on multiple devices... so waht do i do? I could either RENT this license for some fee or rip and convert my product.

Comment Seems like many have self-trained (Score 1) 339

And the solution is to drive about 10-15 mph slower than ongoing traffic. Gawd, every time i get stuck behind some idiot who is driving way slower than traffic, it's someone on a cellphone. Yeah, it may be safer for THEM, but it's crazy frustrating and dangerous when cars have to try to navigate around these moving roadblocks.

Comment Re:It's not entirely wrong... (Score 1) 199

This is partly what the **IA is fighting and partly the FAULT of the **IA b/c of how they've proceeded.

It's very easy for a particular convenience to set into a mind. Then it's really REALLY difficult to change that mindset. So, early on, mp3 filesharing got the mindshare and so now there's a very real problem of many people (especially sub-college aged) to think of music as free and to not even consider the option of paying.

But the RIAA could have intercepted this early on with their approach. Instead of fighting it, causing the filesharers to advance their technologies, the big Media Conglomerates could have leveraged it for their own benefit. True, if they had offered DRM-free mp3s on a pay-basis, there would have been many sneaker-net sharing, but the mindset would still be that "you SHOULD pay for the music."

I honestly think it's too late for the music industry to totally recoup this; i could be rong as iTunes does seem to be selling alot of music, but then the death of Zune and MS plays for never and now Yahoo's drm going away could set it back.

BUT, i think the movie industry still has a chance to establish themselves in the mindshare. While the savvy ones have been downlaoding divx/xvid AVIs/MKVs, using UpnP media servers, and media-shifting their DVDs for a while now, the general populance is only now starting to figure out that they WANT to do these things.

THe DVR has reached a critical mass where end-users are enjoying the convenience. So why shouldn't they consume movies in a similar fashion? They are used to putting a CD into the computer and easily having iTunes put it on their iPod, so why should a DVD be any different?

It's time that the people in charge at the MPAA start thinking about how to provide for their customers. If they do that, i tihnk they'll be surprised at how much they can actually profit from it, WITHOUT having to gouge them!

But then again, this is just all stuff that's been said 100x before, so why expect change now...

Life. Don't talk to me about life. - Marvin the Paranoid Anroid