Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Who manages the loading and unloading? (Score 1) 615

by glenebob (#49708899) Attached to: The Economic Consequences of Self-Driving Trucks

Truckers do a lot of shit at truck stops that are not relevant to autonomous trucks. They buy greasy food, take a piss, get a blowjob from a hooker who just ate greasy food, carve the bugs off the windshield, replace the air freshener, take a nap, call the wife and tell her he misses her while avoiding talking about hooker blowjobs...

The shit that is relevant, such as checking tire pressure, oil level, carving the bugs off the camera lenses, whatever, can easily be done by the attendant. Not rocket science!

Comment: Re:Who manages the loading and unloading? (Score 1) 615

by glenebob (#49706473) Attached to: The Economic Consequences of Self-Driving Trucks

Also, refueling? En route maintenance. Stuff like that?

1) Truck signals for fuel.
2) Dispatch arranges for fuel delivery.
3) Truck pulls over when/where instructed.
4) Fuel truck pulls up, driver transfers fuel.
5) Profit!

Also, existing truck stops could simply employ drivers to bring autonomous trucks in for fueling and then send them on their way.

Same basic idea for maintenance.

Comment: Re:3.5 million truckers (Score 2) 615

by glenebob (#49706413) Attached to: The Economic Consequences of Self-Driving Trucks

Who said anything about replacing truck drivers with autonomous driving systems? Airplanes have autopilot, but they still require TWO pilots. Autonomous trucking systems will be no different. Somebody will have to drive it in city traffic and park it at the freight terminal, and take over when the autonomous system doesn't know how to handle a situation. The difference is that in a plane you usually have seconds or minutes to take over the system, whereas on a road with cars mere feet away, a trucker will have fractions of a second to respond and take over to a situation.

If a plane could simply pull over on the outskirts of town to meet its harbor pilot, long haul freight plane pilots would be on the block, too.

Comment: Re:Many times, newer is actually better. (Score 1) 6

by jawtheshark (#49428549) Attached to: One year since XP OEL.
Different case, and applied to cars, we haven't advanced all that much ever since the introduction of crumple zones and the seat belt. Yes, we have ABS and ESP these days, but those are relatively small improvements.

Also keep in mind that if you can drive a car from the 50ties, you can drive one built in 2015, and inversely. Safely.

Windows

Journal: One year since XP OEL. 6

Journal by jawtheshark
Do you realize that XP was EOLed exactly one year ago?
I know many XP machines still chugging around peacefully without problems: No XPcalypse happened. This entirely fits my predictions.

XP was a (had become) a mature operating system. I abhor the fetish of "newer is better" that reigns in our industry.

The last person that quit or was fired will be held responsible for everything that goes wrong -- until the next person quits or is fired.

Working...