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Comment Re:Labor mobility (Score 1) 474

I believe you are totally unaware of the realities in the E.U. We have the Free Movement principle in the European Union:

http://ec.europa.eu/social/mai...

In fact, there was strongly growing emigration from countries like Spain and Greece (to stronger economies like Germany).

Source:
http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/t...

Comment Re:As a Canadian Particle Physicist (Score 1) 58

Well, no. Since neutrino oscillations are confirmed we are good again as we expect to see only 1/3 of the total neutrino flux (the other 2/3 are the two neutrino flavours muon- and tau-neutrinos that our detectors are not sensitive to)

Before the experimental proof, most scientists tended to side with the Standard Model, i.e. massless neutrinos and therefore no oscillations - which meant that seeing only 1/3 of the expected neutrino flux from the sun indicates something's wrong, either with the sun or with the model of the sun predicting neutrino flux.

Comment Re:Translation ... (Score 1) 92

The authors report coherence times of 120us and 61us for the two (slightly different) Qubits. Experimental evidence for Qubit Q2 is provided in the Supplementary Material and for Qubit Q1 in reference 4.

Also, citing:
" the error can be less than 1%, corresponding to a fidelity above 99% for the two-qubit CZ gate. The fast two-qubit operation frequency implies also that over 100,000 CZ gates can be performed within the single-qubit coherence time. [4]"

and further

"The tremendeous progress of quantum error correction codes over the last decade has resulted in schemes that allow fault-tolerant quantum computing with single and two-qubit errors as high as 1% [10]; values that already seem consistent with the fidelities of these silicon quantum dot qubits. These qubit fidelities could be further improved by lowering the sensitivity to electrical noise. This could be achieved by designing the two-qubit system such that it is completely decoupled from the reservoir during qubit control, possibly by additional pulsing on the barrier gates."

Comment Re:Let me be the first to point out (Score 3, Insightful) 105

My feeling is that artists provide a creative source of "noise" and crazy ideas that are critical for breakthroughs. Such kind of out-of-the-box thinking is heavily sought after in the scientific community. Science really needs sometimes a "mutation" of ideas to make the next big leap. Just throwing money at a problem will give you only incremental small steps of improvement. Ideas are the most important ingredient for scientific breakthrough.
Therefore I encourage scientists to expose themselves to art and I also value artists' contributions although many of them don't make sense (to me).

Comment Re:Nothing Surprising Here (Score 1) 257

Scientists don't get paid to figure out a particular problem, at least not in academia. That happens only in commercial research. In the majority of cases scientists get to select the problem they want to solve themselves (the finding of a sufficiently interesting problem itself being a difficult task). Often in countries there are overseeing funding agencies, like NSF, DARPA, DOD who define broad areas of research focus, but they don't assign them to scientists in a top down manner.

In fact, scientists very often try to explain very obvious things. It's very rare to discover something truly new and usually it is by accident: you find something new and remarkable when you were actually trying to understand the obvious.

Comment Re:Let's see how it works out (Score 1) 106

Anecdotally, I have the opposite to report.

Where Excel 2003 would fail to load an complex file, OpenOffice (didn't try LibreOffice at that time) would load the same file just fine.
Complex in the sense of lot's of cells used ( a few hundred rows with about 50 columns - not that much actually), with only basic arithmetic- no funky math or functions used.

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 412

"they explicitly state that they don't actually think they did"

Where do you find that statement ? In their preprint paper they state:

"An early arrival time of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum of (60.7 ± 6.9 (stat.) ± 7.4 (sys.)) ns was measured. This anomaly corresponds to a relative difference of the muon neutrino velocity with respect to the speed of light (v-c)/c = (2.48 ± 0.28 (stat.) ± 0.30 (sys.)) * 10^-5."

That's as explicitly FTL as their data allows. I don't see any denial there. Yes, they are very cautious and they ask others to confirm, but that is very natural for such unexpected results.

Comment Re:would we have noticed? (Score 1) 1088

With detectors based on Cherenkov radiation like Super-Kamiokande you can determine the direction of the neutrino beam by working out the Cherenkov cone.

The neutrino and photon bursts of SN1987A _have_ been both detected and correlated. The neutrino burst came a few hours earlier than the photons and the explanation was along the line that the photons seen where not the primary photons (i.e. not generated at the same time as the neutrinos).

PC Games (Games)

EA Shutting Down Video Game Servers Prematurely 341

Spacezilla writes "EA is dropping the bomb on a number of their video game servers, shutting down the online fun for many of their Xbox 360, PC and PlayStation 3 games. Not only is the inclusion of PS3 and Xbox 360 titles odd, the date the games were released is even more surprising. Yes, Madden 07 and 08 are included in the shutdown... but Madden 09 on all consoles as well?"

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