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Comment: Likely not. (Score 1) 96

by emil (#49080625) Attached to: Researchers Block HIV Infection In Monkeys With Artificial Protein
This technique will likely be effective against virons in blood plasma, but it will do precisely nothing to a quiescent provirus, so an infected individual will retain infection reservoirs. Unless the active protein can cross the blood-brain barrier, brain infection will also continue and will still lead to accelerated cognitive decline and aids-related dementia. Assuming that it works, this is a godsend for effective control, but a cure it likely is not. A cure will only be accomplished when the silent reservoirs can be coaxed into activity and the host cells containing the provirus are destroyed.

Comment: Re:Not so. (Score 3, Insightful) 190

by emil (#49042099) Attached to: Five Years After the Sun Merger, Oracle Says It's Fully Committed To SPARC

If I want Oracle PL/SQL in Postgres, I have to purchase EnterpriseDB. If you can get EnterpriseDB to give away the "deep Oracle compatibility" for free, many Oracle installations might switch. Let me know how that works out for you.

I'd also like to see PostgreSQL in the TPC-C top ten. That's a lot of work, and for people who need scalability, they don't have time to wait.

Comment: Re:IBM should submit some (Score 1) 190

by emil (#49042061) Attached to: Five Years After the Sun Merger, Oracle Says It's Fully Committed To SPARC

I agree that free software is a good thing, and so does Oracle, as they give away their RedHat clone for free.

Oracle gives away PostgreSQL, MySQL, SQLLite, and several other databases in their clone, and will support them if that is important to you.

Some applications require scalability, availability, or other features that are beyond the realm of the free databases. In those cases, Oracle database XE is free, standard edition is under $10k, and enterprise is available where performance outweighs cost.

I wholeheartedly concur that it will be a good day when a free database gets on the TPC-C top ten list.

Comment: Reboot required to patch glibc (Score 3, Insightful) 117

by emil (#49041819) Attached to: Live Patching Now Available For Linux

Ksplice and it's derivatives won't help you if you need to purge bad glibc code from memory, as we did for the recent "ghost" vulnerability.

Still, it could potentially be nasty if exploited so we strongly recommend immediate patching and rebooting. Without a reboot, services using the old library will not be restarted,” Moore concluded.

Comment: Re:Not so. (Score 1) 190

by emil (#49041725) Attached to: Five Years After the Sun Merger, Oracle Says It's Fully Committed To SPARC

The Dell server is actually running a Sybase product, which is 98% slower than the SPARC benchmark. It is the newest entry on the list.

If you want an inexpensive database, you might look at Oracle XE, which is free. However, it has some rather tight constraints and limitations, and it only runs on x86.

Comment: Not so. (Score 4, Informative) 190

by emil (#49041545) Attached to: Five Years After the Sun Merger, Oracle Says It's Fully Committed To SPARC

If you examine the top two best performing database platforms (as benchmarked by TPC-C score) you will discover that they are both sold by Oracle, and that the SPARC version has both higher performance and a lower cost per transaction than the x86-64 version.

You might find this quote to be particularly interesting:

"I am going to make a promise to you," [Larry] Ellison said. "By this time next year, that Sparc microprocessor will run the Oracle database faster than anything on the planet."

Comment: Please remember... (Score 2) 551

by emil (#48833421) Attached to: Systemd's Lennart Poettering: 'We Do Listen To Users'

...that, while this part of the conversation might not have been the strongest part of the interview, systemd has won an amazing number of technical battles.

FWIW IMHO, absolutely no, a unified development approach is not the main benefit of systemd. The new functionality is absolutely worth the transition pain. Not only can you control (kill) whole classes of processes more simply than ever, but you also get lightweight containers as a door prize.

Comment: Patches for BSDs to run systemd unit files. (Score 1) 551

by emil (#48833375) Attached to: Systemd's Lennart Poettering: 'We Do Listen To Users'

OpenBSD is trying to move from rc.conf.local and inittab into per-daemon startup/shutdown init.d scripts.

It's a shame that someone didn't swoop in with bare-bones unit file functionality (no cgroups, obviously). At least, with a unit file, PID 1 can launch a non-root process, which is hard with SysVinit (I do wonder if I've written my shim correctly).

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (9) Dammit, little-endian systems *are* more consistent!

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