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+ - Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer-> 11 11

An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.


Link to Original Source

Comment: Stop yelling at me for my electronic fence (Score 2) 354 354

Dear FBI,

Just because I choose to prevent your abusive use of e-binoculars to watch me by putting up an e-fence, doesn't mean I'm a pedophile, child pornographer, or terrorist. It means I value my privacy and that I don't trust you.

Please stop abusing your powers.

Thanks,
Me

Comment: Re:So confused (Score 1) 150 150

To be fair, there are some advantages to smarter switches - adjusting light levels automatically based on current demand, keypads for controlling multiple lights to set (potentially different) levels at a time (ex: turn everything off, put lights to a comfortable TV viewing level), and for some setups allowing you to trigger your lights based on time or occupancy (though occupancy/vacancy is built in to switches now too).

For example, I have a switch that does vacancy sensing in my bathroom - now I can leave my fan on to air out the shower when I leave for work in the morning. A friend of mine has an occupancy sensor in his stairwell that turns on (and off) his entryway lights so he doesn't need to walk down and turn them off from their only switch (bad design, but something that happens).


Full disclosure: I work for a company that makes light switches and their control systems.

Comment: The customer's basement (Score 1) 310 310

1. What is the most unusual location you have written a program from?
In the customer's basement. Their house, not their place of work.

2. What is the most unusual circumstance under which you have written a program?
Pretty much the above, but with the added amusement of two other techs standing around while you sit on some heating equipment, wondering why you can't finish this faster.

3. What is the most unusual computing platform that you wrote a program from?
A headless server box? Nothing too exciting here.

4. What is the most unusual application program that you wrote?
I only write usual boring stuff :(

Comment: Re:Yes. (Score 4, Insightful) 338 338

If you're taking an extremely narrow understanding of essential, then yes. However, there are other reasons things might be essential - take Reverse 911 for emergency awareness (requires a phone). More generally, in this case essential infrastructure is actually being used like the term critical infrastructure. Some examples (cribbed without shame):
  • electricity generation, transmission and distribution
  • public health (hospitals, ambulances)
  • water supply (drinking water, waste water/sewage, stemming of surface water (e.g. dikes and sluices))
  • telecommunication

So the question becomes, "is the Internet critical infrastructure", not "is the Internet essential for survival". Personally, I think it falls quite nicely under telecommunications.

Comment: Re:way overblown (Score 1) 254 254

The issue is applying a new patch to an out of date version.

If this is not the definition of updating I don't know what is...

I think the AC means "applying a patch to a version older than it was meant to patch." Like those game patches that have to be applied in order.

Comment: Re:Does anyone actually... (Score 1) 195 195

I do, and it doesn't seem to have impacted my battery life much at all.

I leave it on because it works with my car radio, and I use that (plus an app) to trigger various things, like turning off my WiFi when I leave in the morning. It also lets me play music on long trips and I can do bluetooth calls (in my car, not a headset).

You can do this in a number of ways. IBM chose to do all of them. Why do you find that funny? -- D. Taylor, Computer Science 350

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