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Comment Re:Well then (Score 1) 342

Yup. If I have to whitelist the actual site to read the basic text content, then they can do without my patronage. It's no loss to me. If I pop up noscript and the list of domains is so long I have to scroll it, ditto. OTOH, if the site has only one or two 3rd party domains, I'll allow it. Ghostery and Disconnect manage the rest.

Comment Simple minded political point-scoring (Score 1) 167

Blame Snowden, sure. That's exactly the sort of ready-to-print headline we've come to expect from politicians in the UK - the Daily Fail and other FUD-spreading tabloid press won't even have to re-write it.

Sadly, the tabloid-addicted public will believe it - they've spent decades in a sewer of screaming headlines, and have lost anything resembling critical thinking.

This would be a good time for her maj to put her foot down - she does command the armed forces, after all.

Comment Re:I'd like to hear from content creators (Score 0) 478

I've used Adobe Creative Suite (video) on both PC and Mac. The UI is almost identical, the output from both is satisfactory, but each has advantages and disadvantages.

I prefer the windows solution, because it's cheaper and easier to do progressive upgrades, such as replacing the hard drives, or upgrade the video adapter.

Comment Re: This is what you get. XXX on idea exchange (Score 2) 220

Nonsense. Australia appoints its public law enforcement officials - police chiefs, judges, public prosecutors & defenders, etc - and it works with minimal levels of corruption.

Election of such officials - WITHOUT mandatory voting - just results in interest groups getting their preferred puppet installed, and sets up conditions that encourage corruption. When your continued employment depends on popularity instead of merit, you find ways legal and otherwise to maintain your popularity.

Comment Re:add a clause. (Score 3, Insightful) 190

I'd have thought that would have already been clear in the licencing contract.

"The material is licenced to the purchaser for the purposes stated in appendix A. Ownership and copyright of the material remains at all times with the seller".

So a copyright claim by Epic/Sony would be breach of contract, and hopefully there would be a clause in the contract that the licence is immediately cancelled should there be such a breach of contract.

At least, that's how I would licence any material of mine.

Sony has obviously sent a copy of the video to their legal/enforcement division (did they have a licence to copy the material for that purpose?), who proceeded to scour youtube/vimeo/liveleak for it, without bothering to check who *actually* held the copyright in the original footage.

Comment parallels with industry (Score 4, Interesting) 187

I guess the cut-back-on-staff-to-improve-profitibility(ratings) experiment didn't work.

I would have moved the other three into a different field, maybe a travelling show, visiting schools to do cool science stuff - fewer explosions, sure, but maybe some rocketry +GoPro, or weather balloons. Lots of room for building stuff out of silicone/gelatine, dropping buster onto various surfaces with sensor experiments designed by the students.

Comment lots of laptops (Score 1) 236

1 laptop connected to the big-screen TV, with internet connection for Netflix and ABC iView, and an external HDD for stored content.

1 blu-ray player connected to the TV for occasional discs.

1 eeePC with external powered speakers, exclusively connected to Live365 for music.

Other family members all have a laptop for school, work, and netflix.

Comment Re:Related? (Score 1) 138

An accurate headline should read, "one person out of 45,000 that have worked on Fukushima recovery has developed cancer". In the US , approximately 1.5% of people will be diagnosed with leukemia, and it is more common in men than women. Did this guy smoke cigarettes? The risk is higher if he did. The news reports ignore important stuff like this. In a given group of 45,000 people, we should expect to see over 10 cases of Leukemia per year, but we've only seen one in 3-4 years. Why is that?

That's a very good question, but it's a bit misleading to quote U.S. statistics - it might be different in Japan. There are countries with significantly higher/lower rates of particular cancers (and other diseases) for various reasons, and we should be quoting the "normal" rate for this cancer in Japan, not the USofA.

Comment Re:lack of information. (Score 3, Insightful) 602

Just that - you CANNOT sign away your right to counsel, or your right to sue. You can only choose not to pursue those options.

It's like the various waivers you have to sign to be allowed to do certain potentially dangerous things - "no matter what happens, you can't sue us for negligence" - it's nothing more than a bluff.

Comment Re:lack of information. (Score 2) 602

That was sort of my first thought: what if I get a job elsewhere, and even more interesting, what if I get a job with a competing bank?

Most employers wouldn't be inclined to give me time off to help them, but if my new employer was a competing entity, they might say "sure, take as much time as you want to help them out, just remember you're employed by us, not them, and we'd appreciate you reporting back any interesting information you discover while you're there. In fact, there'll be a bonus in your pay for any such information received."

It'll only take one court case to have the offending clauses in these "contracts" declared invalid.

"Love your country but never trust its government." -- from a hand-painted road sign in central Pennsylvania