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+ - 9 Year Old CEO warns of dangers of phone hacking, demonstrates how its done->

Submitted by abhishekmdb
abhishekmdb (4015829) writes "9 year old Reuben Paul who is CEO of Prudent Games, delivers a keynote address at cyber security conference and demonstrates how dangerous phone hacking is

Meet Reuben Paul. The Harmony School of Science third-grader has accomplished more in nine years than some adults accomplish in a lifetime.

Reuben Paul is pretty well known in cyber security circles for a 9 year old boy because of his exploits. He is also the CEO of Austin, Texas based Prudent Games."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Reconciling the Conventional Methods (Score 1) 68

by dwulf (#30890490) Attached to: Researchers Make a Case For Learning Through Video Game Creation
I always had the idea that learning school subjects through games would be much more entertaining and therefore the retention level would be much higher. I remember many classes (particularly Algebra) that where very boring to me when taught through conventional methods as such, I barely passed the class with a D-. But when I got home, and tinkered around with my Commodore 64 to program very simple games with "Basic" I inadvertently learned Algebraic concepts without realizing it. When I took college Algebra, and I reconciled the similarities of the conventional methods forced upon me in High school and methods I learned though osmosis while developing “simple games” in Basic I aced the class. From that point, I began to realize that games should be a primary method of learning skills. The main problem I have always seen is that very few games deal directly with problems in the real world, It merely simulates a made up environment. I am curious as to how much more effort it would take to build a game and a engaging game interface to, say, trade real stocks for real money instead of virtually made up ones (like the Sims, Second Life, etc.).

After Goliath's defeat, giants ceased to command respect. - Freeman Dyson

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