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Comment: Re:Birds (Score 1) 175

by drmarcj (#21635747) Attached to: Picture-Sorting Dogs Show Human-Like Thought
Pigeons have been trained to discriminate all kinds of things, such as cats and cars. Interesting how it is somehow much more interesting when a mammal like a dog can do it even though their brains are much more human-like? Animal cognition research is full of examples where you can train a pigeon to do something, it goes unnoticed, but if you train a dog or a chimp to do it, it's published in Science and all over the New York Times and BBC webpages.
Portables

+ - Asus stuns Computex with $189 laptop->

Submitted by
slashthedot
slashthedot writes "As if Intel's cheap laptop release last month wasn't enough, Asus sprang a surprise during Intel's Computex keynote today with the announcement of a $189 laptop.
The notebook uses a custom-written Linux operating system, measures roughly 120 x 100 x 30mm (WDH) and weighs only 900g, boots in 15 seconds from its solid-state hard disk. Asus chairman Jonney Shih claimed the 3ePC would be available in all areas of the world, not only developing nations.
http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/114773/asus-stuns-comp utex-with-100-laptop.html"

Link to Original Source
Sony

Sony Sued for Blu-Ray Patent Violation 153

Posted by Zonk
from the how-shiny-is-too-shiny dept.
Jaidan writes "According to a Gamespot article, a California-based company named Target Technology is suing Sony over patents it allegedly holds for silver based reflective surfaces. The suit claims that products marketed under the Blu-ray name infringe on a patent it owns for reflective layer materials in optical discs. Target is seeking a permanent injunction preventing Sony from violating its patent rights in the future, as well as damages with interest, multiplied due to what it characterizes as deliberate and willful infringement. ' The patent addresses what Target called a need for specific types of silver-based alloys with the advantages (but not the price) of gold. According to the patent, the alloys are also more resistant to corrosion than pure silver. Target does not specify in its suit whether it believes all of Sony's Blu-ray discs infringe on its patent, or the suit applies to just a portion of the discs manufactured. The patent was filed in April of 2004 and granted in March of 2006.'"
Businesses

+ - Best Buy Accused of Overcharging

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Connecticut's Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has accused Best Buy of overcharging. It is said that, customers would see one price on Best Buy's website, but when they got to the store the salesscum would show them a different internal site from a kiosk. Best Buy denies the charges. Link"
Media

+ - Finnish court rules CSS "ineffective"

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In an unanimous decision released today, Helsinki District Court ruled that Content Scrambling System (CSS) used in DVD movies is "ineffective". The decision is the first in Europe to interpret new copyright law amendments that ban the circumvention of "effective technological measures".

http://www.turre.com/blog/?p=102"
Privacy

+ - Hack My Son's Computer, Please

Submitted by SafteyInNumbers
SafteyInNumbers (706315) writes "Can an elderly father give police permission to search a password-protected computer kept in his adult son's bedroom, without probable cause or a warrant? In April, a three judge panel of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals said yes. This week, the son's attorney, Melissa Harrison, an assistant federal public defender in Kansas City, will ask the court to reconsider the panel's ruling. At stake is whether law enforcement will have any responsibility to respect passwords and other expressions of user privacy when searching devices which contain the most sensitive kinds of private information. In United States v. Andrus (.pdf), agents suspected that the defendant was accessing websites containing child pornography, but after eight months of investigation still did not have sufficient probable cause to get a search warrant. Instead, they decided to drop by the defendant's house for an impromptu conversation. The suspect was not at home. However, his 91-year-old father answered the door in his pajamas, invited the agents in, and eventually gave them permission to enter his son's bedroom and search the hard drive on his son's password-protected computer. The agents used EnCase to perform the search, a common forensic tool programmed to ignore Windows logon passwords. Agents found child pornography on the computer. Without a judge's permission, the search depended on the father's authority to allow police access to his son's computer. On this point, the fact that the son locked his parents out of the computer with a password is critical. http://www.wired.com/politics/law/commentary/circu itcourt/2007/05/circuitcourt_0523 Looks like it's time to dust off those encryption programs."

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