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Comment Politicization (Score 1) 401

This is s thought provoking paper featuring a theoretical model that pre-sages a breakage in industrialization. Like all such models, this should be looked at as theoretical. Theory is simply a good educated guess until tested. This theory will take a while to test empirically, because the period is so long. After all, we are still unsure of the Kondratieff long wave economic theory that is only 55 to 60 years long because the theory's period is longer than a generation ( The article hits all the political hot buttons of our age: environmental sustainability, income in/equality, and population. Is this model really a theory, or a sales job for a particular political agenda?

Comment Re:There is no such thing as "Security"... (Score 1) 472

or "Privacy" anymore. Perhaps there hasn't been for the last decade or so. .

Relatives of mine who are really smart software engineers do not have Facebook accounts and little to no web presence. They are over 50, so some of this may be generational, but for years, I wondered what they knew that they couldn't tell me. Now, I know.

Submission + - AT&T/T-Mobile Merger: Why DOJ Hates It. (

donb3 writes: "Ever wonder why the Department Justice filed suit against the T-Mobile/AT&T Merger? One possible explanation is the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index. The Herfindahl Index measures how mergers and acquisitions change the competition in a market. Here is a brief explanation of how the Department of Justice measures this index: The Herfindahl-Hirschman Index. Several other proposed mergers have conflicted with this index, including the Mentor/Cadence Graphics merger. Once regulators perform the math, proposed mergers often hit the skids. A brief explanation of the Index is here on Wikipedia, and for those of you who are masochistic, a calculator of your proposed merger is here on the Andrew Chin University of North Carolina School of Law web site."

We all agree on the necessity of compromise. We just can't agree on when it's necessary to compromise. -- Larry Wall