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Submission + - Sea level rise on Northwest European Shelf caused by moon - not man

An anonymous reader writes: This recent (free-access) paper from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland uses a 160-year tidal gauge series from 26 stations in the Baltic Sea to show that the (global) sea level is completely governed by multi-decadal oscillations of the lunar cycle — superimposed on a unchanging and slow (1.2 mm/yr) sea level rise during that long period. The upside of studying the Baltic is that the daily tidal difference is very low in this region, which gives data with low noise. The final correlation coefficient with the lunar influence was 0.997, so not much room for anthropogenic global warming there.

The authors note in the end: "If our theory is correct and no unprecedented sea-level changing mechanism occurs during the ongoing nodal cycle, then the region’s ongoing sea-level rise (quasi-oscillatory rise since 1971) would be expected to culminate around 2011 and thereafter be falling. At the earliest, this prognosis can be empirically documented when the ongoing lunar nodal period is complete in 2020–21, i.e. within the next 6–7 years."

According to the Danish weekly ‘Weekendavisen’) the article was turned down by Nature, Nature Geoscience, Nature Climate, and the Nature-affiliated Earth Science Review before the authors turned to Journal of Coastal Research who happily accepted it. One of the authors, Jens Morten Hansen, believes the reason for Nature's rejection is that it does not fit with the IPCC political agenda.

Submission + - Planetary Society pushes for Mars orbital mission before NASA landing->

MarkWhittington writes: The Planetary Society announced Thursday the results of the “Humans Orbiting Mars” workshop that brought in a number of space experts to develop helpful suggestions for how NASA can fulfill its mandate to send humans to Mars in the 2030s and return them safely to the Earth. The plans is to send a mission to orbit Mars in 2033 in advance of the landing mission in the late 2030s. The workshop believes that this could be done for a NASA budget that increases about two percent a year after the International Space Station is decommissioned in 2024.
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Submission + - An Interview With Chuck Peddle – Charismatic Chipmaking Coryphaeus->

An anonymous reader writes: Chuck Peddle, inventor of the 6502 and the father of the personal computer revolution gets interviewed by the guys at Amp Hour. If you don't know who Peddle is it's time to educate yourself, so make a mug of tea, grab a pack of biscuits, and sit down and listen to the entertaining and insightful Chuck Peddle.
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Submission + - SPAM: How We Build Muscle Faste

An anonymous reader writes: Will have a chance I decided you get there tight little ass all night yes he's your man san Isidro side to side to side again around many jobs you can get moo questions of guys on you book to me your interest already verso move you honey let's hope many as you can don't stop don't stop who's with me good okay loll when you got a new number I'll watch mammy head all hot yeah all the last Russia now all the red or Google Mobile Press Reno shoulders where with my book anti-gay question yourself home you can do it you can do it I believe in you don't stop don't know with certainly not country do now our goal for today Charles nice little jobs his mind.
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Submission + - SPAM: Different Types of IP Security Cameras with their Detailed Description

a2zsecurities writes: Internet protocol (IP) cameras are used to monitor an area remotely. With the help of internet or local network, you can easily gauge the activities occurring at the site. IP cameras are digital video cameras that allow people to monitor in real-time or watch the video recordings of the previous day or distant past from the comfort of their home. There are various types of IP cameras designed for specific purposes. For example, for outdoor surveillance, there are dome shaped IP cameras. PTZ cameras provide different viewing angles while Infrared IP cameras come with night vision feature. Therefore, before investing, you should have a fair idea about the types of security cameras.
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Submission + - Steam after death?

kuzb writes: I'm a gamer. I probably will be until the day it's not possible anymore. Like many others, I've got heavy investment in my steam library which now encompasses hundreds of titles and represents thousands of dollars. As a gamer, the games I've acquired are as important to me as any other item which might have sentimental value to someone else.

It got me thinking, what happens to all this media when I die? What happens with other services where I have media? Is it legal for me to will this content to someone else, or do all the rights to such content just vanish?

Submission + - Karjisatsu: Is the culture around IT causing us to burnout or worse...->

HockeyPuck writes: A blog by John Willis explores the story of one industry peer, Carlo Flores, and his battle against Karoshi or "Death from Overwork". All-night, holiday work, excessive hours, excessive sales efforts, bullying, fear of losing one’s job, and of course screwed up management. Most of the modern day startups have all kinds of tales of employees and ex-employees telling stories related to these stresses., whom can we turn to when we're burning and stressing out? We can turn to each other.
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Submission + - 25 Years in the Making - This is How Photoshop 1.0 Looks Today->

Iddo Genuth writes: In celebration of Photoshop’s 25 anniversary Adobe decided to publish an interesting an a bit nostalgic video which looks at the original Photoshop — version 1.0 announced back in 1990.

There are very few working computers these days that can run Photoshop 1.0 directly, however using an emulator you can more or less reproduce the software as it was a quarter of a century ago. There are many things that we take for granted in Photoshop that you could not do in the original version including using layers (these came only in version 3.0), use live preview or even something as basic as saving your image as JPEG (which was introduced around 1992), not to speak of Camera RAW which was introduced quite a few years later (as there were no commercial digital cameras anywhere). Of course there was also no real internet so the only way to get digital images was by scanning prints...

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User Journal

Journal Journal: Revolution 60: A game review I can get behind. 1 1

This review of Revolution 60 sounds like it was written by me. But I can assure you, it's not. Exerpts:

an insipid, stumbling, humorless mess of a game that should never have left the brainstorming stage - the kind of game social justice warriors insist everyone wants to see, but in reality, the reaction seems to be put that thing back where it came from or so help me.

and

Submission + - Jellyfish are attacking nuclear power plants->

Lasrick writes: The power plant shutdowns (both nuclear and non-nuclear) that jellyfish cause are increasing, possibly due to warming oceans. And it's not just jellyfish: algae and kelp are responsible for wreaking havoc on filtering systems that are proving no match for aquatic life. 'Jellyfish and algae have assaulted nuclear power plants in the United States, Canada, Scotland, Sweden, Japan, and France. In Scotland alone, two reactors at the country’s Torness power station had to shut down in a single week when the seawater they used as a coolant was inundated with jellyfish. (Because of their tremendous need for cool water, nuclear power plants are often located next to oceans and other naturally occurring large bodies of water.)' The IAEA warns that current monitoring and removal systems in place for 'biological fouling' are inadequate and that warming waters are going to cause more and more of these incidents, the costs of which are astronomical.
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Submission + - The science of a bottomless pit

StartsWithABang writes: It’s the ultimate dream of many children with time on their hands and their first leisurely attempt at digging: to go clear through the Earth to the other side, creating a bottomless pit. Most of us don’t get very far in practice, but in theory, it should be possible to construct one, and consider what would happen to a very clever test subject who took all the proper precautions, and jumped right in. Here's what you would have to do to travel clear through the Earth, come out the other side, and make the return trip to right back where you started.

Submission + - Drones and satellites spot lost civilizations in unlikely places-> 1 1

sciencehabit writes: What do the Sahara desert and the Amazon rainforest have in common? Until recently, archaeologists would have told you they were both inhospitable environments devoid of large-scale human settlements. But they were wrong. Here today at the annual meeting of the AAAS, two researchers explained how remote sensing technology, including satellite imaging and drone flights, is revealing the traces of past civilizations that have been hiding in plain sight.
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1000 pains = 1 Megahertz

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