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Comment Re:AI weapons == less collateral damage? (Score 1) 299 299

i think you're correct and that has me concerned. war has become too sterile and easy. making them easier and even less costly for those who wage them, will make it even more likely we rely on war as the first solution.

war is supposed to be hell, that insures that few want to engage in it.

on a related note. this is why an all volunteer army in a bad idea. with no draft, most of the country is shielded from war. those who volunteer for war, know what they are risking.

Comment Re:AI weapons == less collateral damage? (Score 0) 299 299

yes, i was part of the invading army. i wonder how many of the people i met while i was there "oppressing" wish me and my invading "evil" army buddies where still there. we didn't run around cutting heads off left and right like ISIS is doing there now.

time to un-wad your panties, pull them up, move out into the real world and use the brain God gave you. unless you are literally part of the Islamic jihad, the always scary "They" really do want to kill YOU. your mom may want to hear all about your feelings and tell you how good and smart you sound. but you don't have a clue how the real world is. people like you are standing in the way of protecting millions of people in the middle east. people like you are allowing, by inaction and all around tom foolery, ISIS to run rampant unchecked.

until you grow a pair and actually fight, don't lecture those who do on how they do it. you have the luxury of living in peace, only because others keep you.

Comment AI weapons == less collateral damage? (Score 3, Interesting) 299 299

when I was deployed to Iraq, we had a problem with RKG3 attacks on our MRAPS. at the time, it was one of the few things that could do real damage. RKG3 are hand thrown EFP devices. when the insurgents would attack, they would target the vehicles that had crew serve weapons pointing in the other direction. this would mean that the crew member on the weapon would not always see who threw the grenade. the lead and follow vehicle gunners would have their own fields of fire to scan and would probably miss the thrower as well. leading to confusion as to who is attacking. confusion, explosions == bad things.

an automated system that scans 360 degrees hundreds if not thousands of times a second, which can acquire, track and if need be eliminate the target, would surely cut down on collateral damage and innocent people getting killed.

Submission + - Einstein's happiest thought was really macabre

StartsWithABang writes: Sure, Einstein came up with both special and general relativity, revolutionizing our understanding of how the Universe works. But how did he come up with his new theory of gravity? Oddly enough, by imagining someone plummeting towards their doom. By comparing a freely-falling observer with one accelerating under a non-gravitational force, Einstein unearthed the equivalence principle, and eight years later, General Relativity came spilling out. The Universe has never been the same.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: In modern times how should we define a dystopian government? 2 2

trippin_efnet writes: Wikipedia says dystopia is literally translated as "not-good place". In light of the many abuses of power we have seen come from world governments lately, how should we define whether or not we are approaching dystopia? Are we already there? This isn't a question about which political ideology got us here. The question is how far can a government push before it is common knowledge amongst all political ideologies to be a dystopia?

Comment Cable TV provider Killer (Score 1) 205 205

the HBO deal, is the death of cable tv companies as we know it. they may even know it. this is really huge and a big win for everyone. no government imposed fake, net "neutrality" needed, the quasi free market working it out.

when the consumer can pick and choose the channels they really want to watch, and only pay for those, you win and the producers of real content win.

I wonder if this deal was in the works when Steve Jobs was still around, because if so, he really did revolutionize tv as we know it in the late 20th and early 21st century.

those of you not understanding the significance of this deal, you will in a few years. wait for it...

Comment Re:We'll know if its a good bill.. (Score 1) 347 347

use your brain and think for once. you people who require government to hold your hand for everything thing are really starting to endanger the rest of us.

rules by definition make things less neutral and less free.

now, i'm pretty sure you broke some of your moms rules by using the computer before you did your chores, so let the rest of us free people, go back having a conversation about the rule of law and you nanny staters heaping more government chains on us.

Comment Re:We'll know if its a good bill.. (Score 0) 347 347

they also can't write law... but we have this new power grab aimed at controlling something that doesn't need to be controlled. under the guise of keeping things free and open. you don't make things free and open by regulating and mandating. freedom works it all out on its own.

Comment Re:Is this a Bears Sh1t in the Woods story? (Score 2) 119 119

wait for it. it may come to that. it's a logical extension of current trends. when those with money and skills exit faster then the flood of unskilled government benefit seekers. we can't very well have all the greedy producers abandon all the needy voters.

not too far fetched.

Comment smells fishy (Score 0) 94 94

how come it's always human ancestors we find and never ape or some other primates ancestors?

this fact alone strikes me as funny. and not funny ha ha, funny.

you'd think that just once, somebody would stumble upon one by mistake if nothing else. guess there is no money/glory in that so they're all ancestors to man.

Comment Re:Just damn (Score 1) 411 411

i thought it went without saying, but judging from some of the replies to my comment, i guess common sense is dead.

with free will, comes responsibility. we are responsible for our choices, not the government, not my neighbors. me, myself, I... those of you that want to take care of people who make bad choices are ridiculous. yes, worthy or ridicule. where does it stop? where is the line drawn? we are not property of the state and are thus not their responsibility.

smokers are free to smoke, and they are free to take care of their own damn medical bills. this is why "free" "government" health care is so evil, it makes you the property of others.

he who pays, decides.

Comment Re:Sure, some access is bad (Score 1) 53 53

yikes! tell me who exactly passed "net neutrality"? i believe a very small group of APPOINTED bureaucrats, imposed their agenda with ZERO congressional oversight. they wouldn't even give congress(who is our elected law makers) a copy of what they planned on imposing.

i fail to see how this is "passing" anything. this is more along the lines of a executive decree, subject to the whims of whoever is in control at the time.

gay marriage, is overwhelmingly voted down in most states where it comes up to a vote or addressed by its elected officials. there again, a very small group of appointed judges(better then the bureaucrats from the first case, but unelected none the less) decreeing against the will of the people.

what good is passing anti-corruption laws, when they ignore the law? what makes one more followable then another?

the government breaks your leg, and makes you pay for the government provided(free) crutch.

"Ignorance is the soil in which belief in miracles grows." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

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