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Comment: Re:Here's what I don't get (Score 1) 367

by dingen (#46545073) Attached to: Linux May Succeed Windows XP As OS of Choice For ATMs

Here's a source that says 6 out of every 10 ATMs is running a version of XP of which support will end coming April: http://www.computerworld.com/s...

In the UK, at least the nation's top 5 banks are paying Microsoft extra fees in order to keep supporting their soon-to-be-obsolete ATMs: http://www.digitaltrends.com/c...

This wouldn't be happening if the machines in question would be running the embedded version of XP, now would it?

Comment: Re:Here's what I don't get (Score 2) 367

by dingen (#46544347) Attached to: Linux May Succeed Windows XP As OS of Choice For ATMs

No. The ATMs in question are running XP Pro, not Embedded. The same thing is happening in the UK, where banks are paying Microsoft hundreds of millions of dollars for extended support contracts (link), just to keep releasing patches every now and then. This wouldn't be the case if the machines were on XP Embedded.

Comment: Re:Laughable (Score 4, Insightful) 260

by dingen (#46497187) Attached to: The Era of Facebook Is an Anomaly

The basic premise, that it is an anomaly for us to come together into a common social space, is so ridiculous that I have to wonder what her agenda is for making such a blatantly false claim.

People came together from their community to the marketplace to socialize. People came together at church every single Sunday.

You don't get it. The point is that the entire world didn't come together at the same marketplace, or the same church building, or live in the same city for that matter. It's unnatural for humans to all be in the same spot to socialize, we rather split up in groups of manageable size. That's the premise of the author. Now whether that's true or false remains to be seen, but at least understand the point the article is trying to make.

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.

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