Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Last Chance - Get 15% off sitewide on Slashdot Deals with coupon code "BLACKFRIDAY" (some exclusions apply)". ×

Comment Re:All Robocalls should be illegal (Score 1) 108

I have a call blocker installed at home, and it is awesome. When someone calls from a blocked number or a "Private" or "No Info" number, my house phones never even ring.

The only problem is that it commonly blocks known good callers if the phone company doesn't display the caller ID info fast enough. It keeps me from calling the house from my cell on a fairly regular basis. No bid deal, just redial. I have had complaints from several family members that it keeps dropping their calls, but that is a small price to pay to be able to watch an entire movie without someone interrupting me to try and sell me something via cold call.

Comment Re:Time to abandon normal phones? (Score 2) 217

Mine is whitelist capable, but that's too restrictive for me. I don't know what number my pharmacy will be calling from to confirm a prescription and I don't want to maintain that growing list of numbers. During the last election cycle I got 1-2 calls a night for about 2 days. By then all the major call centers had been blocked and I stopped getting harassed by pollsters and politicians. I even have a few entire prefixes blocked out due to high spam calls coming from that area code. My only complaint is that it is too easy to accidentally add a good number to the blacklist. I've added myself a couple of times. Easy enough to fix, though.

Comment Re:Time to abandon normal phones? (Score 1) 217

Get one of these:

The only downside is that if you enable blocking of no caller ID, Unknown, 000-000-0000, etc, it will block legit calls if the caller ID doesn't show up fast enough. I LOVE mine. I was getting 2-3 calls per night with 5ish more per day on the machine. This stopped them. All of them. If one gets through, I push the big red button and it hangs up and adds them to the block list.

Comment Re:What's next? (Score 2) 292

Chapter breaks allow for a reader to be able to step away from the novel knowing they haven't left a cliffhanger on the next page. Think of it like a scene change in a movie. I can't stand just picking some random place to stop reading a book because I have to go. If I decide to quit reading in the middle of a chapter, I check to see how much is left. If it is just a page or two more, I'll finish the chapter.

Paragraph breaks let my brain codify smaller chunks of data for parsing more efficiently than long run-on paragraphs. It just works better.

Comment Re:Yes, it's click-bate, but... (Score 1) 165

When I was much younger, I left an electric range on warm for days. I never noticed until I set a box of rice krispy treats on the warming burner and left them for hours. It was a small apartment and counter space was a premium. I often stored flat things on the range to save space. Needless to say, I don't do that anymore. Since then, I've always had a certain paranoia about leaving the range on. Now I have gas, so no worries.

Comment Re:Yes, it's click-bate, but... (Score 2) 165

1. Buy a new phone.
2. Get a new sim with your current number on it.
3. Restore last backup to new phone.
4. Profit!

I know all the important numbers I usually call since Siri's name recognition isn't really reliable enough to use. I usually just dial by saying "dial 555-7654"
At college in '93 someone in the computer science building connected the Coke machine to the net. You could telnet in and get the current temp with an ascii art representation of how many cans were loaded in each slot. Totally useless, but totally awesome. I had it programmed into TinyFugue so I could check and see if the Dr Pepper slot was full at 3 AM just by hitting F8 when I was mudding in the lab on Muddog. And now I feel old.

While I don't NEED my stove to be internet aware and firmware upgradeable, it would be cool if it could be polled to check the burner status or if it sent me an alert if it had been on for longer than is sane so I don't burn my house down. The market can dictate what is and isn't useful. I doubt you'll see too many connected blenders. I guess we'll see!

Comment Re:Misleading-AOL is free (Score 1) 54

My 78 year old boss's AOL account was hacked a few weeks ago. It started receiving 40-50 undeliverable returns every 4-5 hours in batches. I know it was using a strong password because I set it myself a few weeks before that. I was able to use the obvious breach as a way to finally get the AOL account turned off. Believe it or not, he was still paying 24.95 a month for AOL access. Nevermind the fact that we run our own email server and I can point an alias anywhere he wishes. I think for him it was like an old friend. Forget that all the people he corresponds with use his new account and he's just looking in from time to time to sift through the spam. He knew he hadn't used the account in years, but he'd had it since he'd had a personal computer. Sometimes it's hard for people to just let go.

Personally, I've had too many email addresses to get attached to one.

Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons.