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Comment: Re:if you're worried about the collapse of society (Score 1) 509

by davesays (#47463627) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?
True, I was looking at the commentary sweeping us unto the Utopian future not the stone age. But you're right, it could go that way (and there would be no malpractice but the hours and clients are still terrible. I think really many of the comments are good for a single generation, then spin the wheel and go again...

Comment: Re:Go into the trades (Score 1) 509

by davesays (#47463521) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

Construction, electrician, plumber, welder. You can't offshore these jobs, they must be done here.

But you can on-shore cheaper labor. H1-B? I grew up in southern California. I am not a union fan but this is instructive. My uncle was a plasterer in the plasterers union. They did mostly drywall but he was a highly skilled finish specialist and troubleshooter who could actually "plaster" a wall, do moldings etc. and made a good living. In came the third world labor at $8/hr to do all the drywall in LA and broke the union. Once the union was gone they immediately charged almost the same as the union plasterers. No reason not to anymore...

Comment: Re:Stripper! (Score 1) 509

by davesays (#47463485) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

Very few jobs will exist for humans in any area of work much sooner than most people think. Obviously society will have to pay people not to work. Freedom might become a much more real concept when people are freed from monetary demands. The very notion of concepts such as socialism, communism and capitalism will become quaint and obsolete concepts.

I understand the thrust of your point, but if someone else provides your living you are a slave. They can stop providing it at will. They can choose to provide it only if they "insert any restriction here;" like all your data/communication/thoughts (in the future) belong to them. Point taken, but I don't *want* to belong to someone.

Comment: Re:if you're worried about the collapse of society (Score 1) 509

by davesays (#47463437) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?
NO! I don't mean to be rude. I work with some great OBs but it is a terrible job. I work IT at a hospital and I work every department at every level. MDs are not going away so any field will do; surgeons especially cardiac are treated very well. Robots are coming in but as a tool for surgeons. Anesthesiologists are raking it in but that may be more prone to automation in the future. Nephrologist, neurologist, pathologist, the list is never ending, pick something you'll love (bioinformatics?). OBs have the worst patients, crappiest hours, highest malpractice insurance. This advice is from MDs. Unless she has an inalienable passion to be an OB, avoid it at all costs

Comment: Re:A bunch of nuns? (Score 1) 800

by davesays (#46943709) Attached to: Autonomous Car Ethics: If a Crash Is Unavoidable, What Does It Hit?

Actually, this raises a more interesting question (at least to me) which your little thought experiment approaches. What if my autonomous car decides that the action to take that is likely to cause the least harm is to kill the driver? For example, what if the car has the opportunity to swerve off the side of a mountain road and drop you 1000 feet onto some rocks to avoid a crash that would have killed far more people than simply you? Is my autonomous car required to act in my own best interest, or should it act in the best interests of everyone on the road?

What if the oncoming car makes the same decision (similar programming) and both cars drive off the cliff?

Comment: Re:Personal Details (Score 1) 276

by davesays (#46433233) Attached to: Should Newsweek Have Outed Satoshi Nakamoto's Personal Details?
Because someone has created something, or become rich, gives you no ethical reason to know there most personal details? Why do you believe they forfeit their privacy any more than someone who is not rich, or has not created anything? We are talking about human rights. If they created something useful for society; use it, don't abuse them...

Comment: Re:One Cannot Help But Wonder (Score 2) 384

by davesays (#44664981) Attached to: NSA Officers Sometimes Spy On Love Interests

How Senator Mitch McConnell got his information about Ashley Judd's private medical data for a slander campaign; and not see a corollary of the humanity that is the NSA?

If you read the news or the transcripts you would have seen they were talking about *what she wrote in her autobiography.* No one accessed her private medical data...

Comment: Re:Fuck 'em (Score 1) 204

You did a beautiful job of paraphrasing, reminded me so much of the original: "But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security."

+ - Microsoft taught NSA how to crack encrypted emails->

Submitted by davesays
davesays (922765) writes "Documents leaked by former government contractor Edward Snowden show that Microsoft helped the National Security Agency (NSA) work around the encrypted code on its new Outlook portal... Microsoft also gave the FBI easier access to its cloud storage service SkyDrive and let the NSA have access to email on Outlook and Hotmail before it was encrypted."
Link to Original Source

Comment: A brief response to the naysayers (Score 3, Informative) 100

Disclaimer: I do not believe technology is the best answer for everything. I am the most adventurous person in my hospital IT Department so I get to go in ORs all the time (I was there yesterday). 1 - No code review: the devices are not "part of" the surgery they are peripheral; they do not code review every digital clock, cell phone in a surgical staff's pocket, or every iPod playing music en-suite. 2 - No distraction: I can tell you these people are serious professionals. The doctor was no more distracted by the tech during the operation than a coder would be by his dormant webcam or an email message coming in. Regards, Dave

Comment: This is too simple (Score 2) 341

by davesays (#43970269) Attached to: What Can You Find Out From Metadata?
If what you can learn from the meta-data is useable for fighting terrorism, which is rare, it will be far more easily used for nefarious purposes which are common. If it is "not easy" to use against citizens it will be too hard to make it very useful against terrorism. Either my rights are infringed because of the data - or the program serves no purpose.

Comment: Misconceptions (Score 1) 152

by davesays (#43890717) Attached to: Surgeries On Friday Are More Frequently Fatal
I am IT staff at a hospital and end up working on the in-suite PCs alot since coworkers don't like being in a room with a patient open. The surgery schedule gets busier throughout the week with the busiest day being Thursday; at my hospital that is really the "Friday" of the OR. For reasons mentioned above only cases of eminent need are scheduled for Fridays and nothing on the weekend. If you are having surgery on a Friday or the weekend you are in a fairly grave state already. Also: All doctors, surgeons and staff do rotations and coverage; so "shitty doctors and nurses and up working the weekends" is not a reality.

Vax Vobiscum

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