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Comment: Re: Opening moves (Score 1) 315

by dallaylaen (#36651538) Attached to: World's Best Chess Engine Outlawed and Disqualified

1. c4, leading to the English opening, is a perfectly valid move.

However, openings are not played by engines, but rather stored in a database. Likewise, endgames are played using more or less fixed algorithms. It's complicated positions with lots of pieces and no forced winning combination that count.

Comment: Re:Save WinKey, kill Insert (Score 1) 806

by dallaylaen (#30766672) Attached to: Does Your PC Really Need a SysRq Button Anymore?

I use the middle mouse button, since I'm a Linux (and therefore X Window) user.

As for the ins key... Ok. I was too hard, it's a mere key after all.

Let it live, just change the behaviour: Ins copies, Shift+Ins pastes, and Ctrl+Ins switches insert/overwrite more.

This way it's harder to destroy data by accidentally hitting a tiny key residing right between Home, Delete and Backspace.

Comment: Save WinKey, kill Insert (Score 3, Interesting) 806

by dallaylaen (#30765580) Attached to: Does Your PC Really Need a SysRq Button Anymore?

Winkey is very useful.

I have a ton of tiny shell scripts invoked by Win + $key (via xbindkeys):

"Grey+" / "Grey -" -- volume control
G -- google current selection (see xclip (1))
W -- search Wikipedia (or Russian wikipedia with shift)
A -- open terminal
K -- invoke xkill (1)
L -- lock screen
and some more

On the other hand, the invenror of the Insert key deserves a mousetrap being put right under the light switch in their room.

Comment: I guess it's rather "netcluster" (Score 1) 147

by dallaylaen (#29622315) Attached to: ARM and Dual-Atom Processors in New Portables

As a followup, how long until we see a netmainframe?

This particular one would probably evolve into a "netcluster". See: 1 instant-on Linux/ARM, 1 Linux/ARM in the network controller, 1 Linux/GPU in the videocard, and 1 Linux inside the BIOS.

Oh, and I forgot the dual-core Atom running Windows.

Comment: Re:Dell does a terrible job of advertising it! (Score 3, Interesting) 147

by dallaylaen (#29621271) Attached to: ARM and Dual-Atom Processors in New Portables

1% of users run Linux
10% of users know that "Linux is something other than Windows"
89% of users don't know what Linux is at all.

So saying "It runs Linux" it's 1% advertisement, 10% confusion (since it ALSO runs Windows) and 89% unneeded technical details.
Not saying "It runs Linux", on the other hand, is 1% wtf?, 99% unnoticed, and 100% safe from legal or commercial point of view.

Or, putting my worn tinfoil hat on, it might be a requirement from MS to not say "It runs Linux" to get their nice OEM discounts.

Comment: Re:Pirated AV is much more detectable (Score 1) 291

by dallaylaen (#29609851) Attached to: Microsoft Blocks Pirates From Security Essentials Software

I started out with Slackware in 2000, and run Linux exclusively since 2005.

However, the specific social group I'm talking about is probably the hardest to switch.

They have enough knowledge to feel confident with Windows -- but not with FOSS; they seldom pay for software -- no "but it's free" argument.

Comment: Pirated AV is much more detectable (Score 1) 291

by dallaylaen (#29600603) Attached to: Microsoft Blocks Pirates From Security Essentials Software

An antivirus is useless without constant updates, which makes it relatively easy to reveal cracked copies and/or duplicate serial numbers.

In fact, I see a number of people here in Russia who pay for the AV but not for Windows, Office, or e.g. Photoshop. Why? They are tired of constantly searching for cracks and getting infected in the meantime.

Now those freeloaders are given a choice: a pirated OS and paid-for AV, or a paid-for OS and a free AV.

Smart move.

Comment: Edited keyboard layout. And couldn't edit it back! (Score 1) 739

by dallaylaen (#27712253) Attached to: What Did You Do First With Linux?

That was in 2000. A friend of mine brought me a Slackware clone (I didn't even know what Slackware meant at the time) on four floppies. After some effort we managed to install it.

I noticed that the keyboard layout didn't exactly match my keyboard. "No problem", he said, "just edit that text file and tell the system to use it". I did it, and it got a bit better. Then I tried once again, and again, and finally could not save the file any more.

I had to reinstall from scratch.

It took me several years to switch completely, but Linux had won my heart already.

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