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Comment: Somehow I can't give this author credibility... (Score 1) 191

by daiichi (#18563847) Attached to: Why Powered USB Is Going to Fail
Although I'm sure he knows what he's talking about when it comes to the pros and cons of USB (I certainly can't speak for it), I somehow can't acknowledge his credibility when he makes so many factual errors in his article. To whit (and I'm going to ignore the implication that somehow the Apple II was only "along side [the PC] riding the new technology boom"--rather than predating the PC and helping cause the technology boom):

That said, the IBM PC had something unique for it's day: a keyboard that wasn't built into the case. The plug this keyboard used was typically called the AT keyboard port1, named after the IBM PC-AT family of computers. This plug was about an inch in diameter, round, and had 5 pins.

The first keyboard connector for the IBM PC and the XT (the 5 pin DIN) was called, believe it or not, simply a "keyboard connector." Yes, people nowadays erroneously refer to it as an "AT keyboard connector"--but that's only because they're so new to the PC game that they didn't realize that there was a distinct difference between the XT and AT protocols (most of the new keyboards during that turbulent transition had a switch to account for the protocol change). Yes, this distinction is actually explained a bit in his footnote... but still, his sentence is historically incorrect. Here is a link that can explain the protocol difference far better than I can: http://www.clickykeyboards.com/index.cfm/fa/items. main/parentcat/11066/subcatid/0/id/176955

Now you could build a computer with only two or three kinds of plugs and never have to worry about how to explain to your grandmother what the difference between SCSI and PS/2 is and why she can't plug her new printer into either of them. By 1998, all Apple Macintoshes were also shipping with USB, ...

Again, the implication is that somehow the popular computer (e.g., a "PC") pre-dated the Apple's adoption of the standard whereas the exact opposite is true. It was only after the Macintosh adopted USB that the standard actually took off. Here is a link for a more accurate history of this transition: http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/power/librar y/pa-spec7.html

Now you could build a computer with only two or three kinds of plugs and never have to worry about how to explain to your grandmother what the difference between SCSI and PS/2 is and why she can't plug her new printer into either of them.

The author neglects to take into account that although there is only one overarching "USB Protocol" you still need to explain to your grandmother why she needs to use a cable with an "A" port instead of a "B" port or a mini USB 2.0 port, or the Canon USB port.... Still, I agree that this is a great deal better than we had prior to the adoption of USB.

The article itself was generally correct in its assessment of the impact of the USB port on industry. I just take issue with the rewriting of history as I (and I am sure, many of you) were there to witness it firsthand.

When in doubt, mumble; when in trouble, delegate; when in charge, ponder. -- James H. Boren

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