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Submission + - Apple Launches Quality Program for MacBook Pro Anti-Reflective Coating Issues (

cristiroma writes: Apple has issued an internal notice about a new Quality Program that addresses anti-reflective coating issues on MacBook and MacBook Pro models with Retina displays, as confirmed by multiple sources. These issues include the anti-reflective coating on displays wearing off or delaminating under certain circumstances.

Submission + - Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data (

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.

Submission + - Team constructs silicon 2-qubit gate, enabling construction of quantum computers (

monkeyzoo writes: A team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney has made a crucial advance in quantum computing. Their advance, appearing in the journal Nature, demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate — the central building block of a quantum computer — and, significantly, did it in silicon. This makes the building of a quantum computer much more feasible, since it is based on the same manufacturing technology as today's computer industry. Until now, it had not been possible to make two quantum bits 'talk' to each other — and thereby create a logic gate — using silicon. But the UNSW team — working with Professor Kohei M. Itoh of Japan's Keio University — has done just that for the first time. The result means that all of the physical building blocks for a silicon-based quantum computer have now been successfully constructed, allowing engineers to finally begin the task of designing and building a functioning quantum computer.

A key advantage of the UNSW approach is that they have reconfigured the 'transistors' that are used to define the bits in existing silicon chips, and turned them into qubits. "The silicon chip in your smartphone or tablet already has around one billion transistors on it, with each transistor less than 100 billionths of a metre in size," said Dr Menno Veldhorst, a UNSW Research Fellow and the lead author of the Nature paper. "We've morphed those silicon transistors into quantum bits by ensuring that each has only one electron associated with it. We then store the binary code of 0 or 1 on the 'spin' of the electron, which is associated with the electron's tiny magnetic field," he added.

He said that a key next step for the project is to identify the right industry partners to work with to manufacture the full-scale quantum processor chip.

Comment Re:Do no evil? (Score 1) 193

Yeah, "poor" good guys Google - how can you blame the drug dealer? He's only handling the stuff...
I love when no one can be blamed. How about shooting first, as questions later - That way, Google would be much more "careful" about the stuff is handling. Then you wouldn't have this scenario in the first place.

Submission + - offline due to government shutdown (

AngryNick writes: The shutdown of the US Federal government has resulted in and many other government sites being shutdown or frozen in time. From the Christian Science Monitor:

After the government shutdown at midnight EST on Oct. 1, the World Wide Web became a little less accessible. Many major government agencies either went entirely offline or only offered static homepages, with disclaimers that information would not be updated. Social media use was suspended with final tweets and posts telling followers services would be suspended. Furloughed government workers won’t even be able to check their email to find out when they need to come back to work.

Comment Re:What stops people from redistribution? (Score 1) 97

Piracy drops because sharing on torrent is pointless (unless you are a linux distro or some sort of big chunk of data).
In my experience most people don't WANT TO PAY! And that's why 99% of the torrents are breaking copyright rules.
Because an album costs between 15$ and $40 in countries where average salary is $250 and where is $2500 (and gives $1 to the artist). Would you pay like 10% of your montly income for an album?
I'm very sure the way of distributing music will change

"Summit meetings tend to be like panda matings. The expectations are always high, and the results usually disappointing." -- Robert Orben