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Comment: Re:let me correct that for you. (Score 3, Insightful) 619

Not the GP. The CEO at my work gets $100+k a year, and he rips off government funding, rips off his employees (steals directly from our pay), and he's been known to steal software licences, pirate software and video. I'd bet that he uses the IT budget to buy his home computer equipment, too.

So there's your citation.

Wow, a solid citation. You do realize you're only hurting your argument by singling out a single person out of a world of 6B people as proof that rich people cheat. Don't make yourself look blatantly ignorant, back up your opinions man. Besides, I don't think most people would consider a CEO that makes money in the $100+K/year a CEO of much of anything. Many regular white collar jobs make more money than that. That's probably upper-middle class at best, which in fact works against your conclusions.

Comment: Re:This propaganda is worse than 2003 Iraq fiasco. (Score 4, Insightful) 667

by conquistadorst (#47500013) Attached to: Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

They use this science to incite wars in Libya, Syria, Palestine, now Ukraine. And if US burns through all Ukrainians, they'll continue ther wars with Poles, Estonians and others. I'm a Pole - that's why I'm freaking out. I want no part in this madness.

You can't be a Pole, if you were you'd already be suspicious what Russia's intentions from the very beginning. The truth is, there is close to zero appetite for war from any of the western nations of any kind, with any kind of involvement. Especially the United States. All everyone wants is Russia to leave Ukraine. If Putin is so *desperate* to avoid conflict in Ukraine then then please explain why he's even there to begin with? Oh, he only wanted Crimea, I forgot. But nothing else, he has promised! Don't worry! Anyway, if you were truly a Pole you'd be taking note of Putin's actions, not his words. Nobody wants a war, not even Russia, not the West, nobody. In fact Russia would much, much prefer to do this quietly via political maneuvering and flexing its military muscle rather than actually starting a conflict. However if everyone did as you suggest and stood aside, it'll be a few years and Putin will do it again with yet another country. Just wait and see.

You're right on WW1, you're right on Iraq, but you're wrong on this one and you're also conveniently ignoring WW2. History doesn't repeat itself but it does rhyme. Stick with the facts, Russia unequivocally annexed Crimea. I'm sorry but taking land from another country is sort of considered a "big deal" if you know what I mean.

Comment: Russia has no choice (Score 4, Interesting) 503

by conquistadorst (#47481587) Attached to: Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet
Russia has no choice, they have to do everything in their power to stem the international avalanche of disdain that would otherwise befall them. Think about it:
  1. 1. Russia denies wanting to annex eastern Ukraine
  2. 2. Russia denies supporting rebels
  3. 3. Russia denies arming rebels
  4. 4. Rebels then shoot down an international civilian aircraft using the very weapons they weren't supposed to have

If the rebels are ever confirmed to have shot down the plane all of Russia's denials fall apart like a house of cards. Caught red handed. Except now there's international blood on their hands instead of just Ukrainian. Unfortunately for Ukraine, nobody really cares about them except their neighbors. So on that note, you can be guaranteed they will stop at nothing to prove rebels were not at fault. I have no doubt there will be people that will be "silenced". The stakes are simply too damn high.

Comment: Yep (Score 1) 710

I can attest to this personally. I'm unfortunately the most green person I personally know but I never wear it on my sleeve. My motives aren't completely altruistic all the time since I'm often motivated in doing it by saving money. My town's recycling tote is full every week, I turn off appliances and devices like a nazi, I carpool at every opportunity even if it's me the one driving, I keep the temperatures very conservative in my house, I minimize my laundering, I reuse grocery bags instead of buying garbage bags, I buy LEDs whenever I can score 50%-off or more (my house is 75% LED now, rest is CFL), I drive instead of flying whenever practical, I've always hypermile'd all of my vehicles including my latest Prius which pushes 60mpg, buy things in bulk to reduce packaging, solar powered exterior lights, and I even use the bare minimum for soaps and detergents. Notice nearly all of these save me money. The green aspect is extra bonus. Whether or not global warming is man made, no one can dispute the benefits of keeping our environment clean if it's easy to do.

However, contrast that with some friends and family which are bleeding heart tree huggers, but all have gigantic houses with AC on full blast, drink their plastic water bottles on a daily basis, throw things out that are perfectly recyclable, running incandescent lights, have 3 cars, and driving their SUVs, sports car, and/or Hummers. But they donate money to renewable green energy sources!!!! lol

If anyone is going to accuse me of being a tree hugger it's going to be because they've been watching me carefully, not because I've been preaching it...

Comment: Missing the point (Score 3, Insightful) 772

by conquistadorst (#47107137) Attached to: Belief In Evolution Doesn't Measure Science Literacy
His point on this item:

What is embarrassing, though, is for those who don't understand something to claim that their "belief" in it demonstrates that they have a greater comprehension of science than someone who says he or she "doesn't" believe it.

I've witnessed and do witness over and over. Whether it's about evolution, dark matter, global warming, etc. It's just a basic fallacy of human nature. I know something you don't (even though I'm not privy to a complete understanding of how it works) therefore I must be smarter than you and you must be dumb... but don't you dare challenge me any questions on it because I will get super pissed. Kind of the applied definition of "ignorance" in action.

Or in other words, believing in science others have painstakingly proven for you is not an automatic cure for ignorance. When you put it that way, it's common sense isn't it?

Comment: Re:We have an advertising bubble... (Score 1) 154

by conquistadorst (#47100423) Attached to: Agree or Disagree: We are in another tech bubble.

No, Google is fine. As is Facebook. You have 1B+ users, you're probably ok, advertising isn't going away - but there's only so much needed. And mobile advertising is much less useful than web advertising. Everyone *else* is pretty much doomed.

The first word shouldn't be "no". Bubbles don't imply all the companies are worthless, only that they're overvalued. The company being "fine" doesn't mean they won't lose value. If social media investors suddenly realize they've been over valuing them all along it would create a market stampede for the doors. Even when bubbles "pop" most companies survive just fine but they're no where near previous valuations. Sometimes for years, sometimes forever.

Comment: Come on (Score 1) 410

by conquistadorst (#46831697) Attached to: F.C.C., In Net Neutrality Turnaround, Plans To Allow Fast Lane
This is the equivalent of UPS charging an online retailer additional fees for delivering too many packages thereby placing an undue burden on UPS's existing their distribution network, even though all of their buyers already paid for shipping. Common sense should already deem this silly.

Comment: Re:u wot m8 (Score 1) 575

by conquistadorst (#46755601) Attached to: Microsoft Confirms It Is Dropping Windows 8.1 Support

Just thank your lucky stars that you're not in Linux-land, or some other godawful free software environment, 'cause you would have to type

>apt-get upgrade

in a terminal. This is obviously way too difficult for any human being, so bless Gates and Ballmer and whoever came after him for letting us not have to type that

While I agree everyone should have a minimum level of technical expertise to survive in today's world. I'm picturing my mother calling me asking how to open a prompt, type in the command, among 1000's of other commands... everyday. No thanks!

Comment: Embryonic stem cell research (Score 1, Flamebait) 86

by conquistadorst (#46697121) Attached to: Stem-Cell Research Funding Institute Is Shuttered
Makes good research but I wonder if it could ever by economically viable. Maybe someone can enlighten me and explain otherwise.

I imagine if it ever hit mainstream with usage on a public daily basis, you'd need millions of embryos, perhaps even every day? What? Would women be expected to line up for embryo drives like we have blood drives today?

Comment: Re: Really? (Score 2) 169

Bit coin is reliable. The shitty exchanges are not. If you have someone access to your paper wallet then the effect would be the same.

Except nobody's paper wallet is connected to the internet, and few people carry significant hordes of cash in their wallet anyway so this isn't really a fantastic comparison. Yes, one could say, "well you can move it offgrid" then you can also do the same thing with your wallet and toss it in a safe or bank security box, only then would they become equals?

That being said, your wallet is anything but a "safe" place but I'd still say a networked computer is worse. Bitcoins on a networked computer would be probably be akin to someone leaving their cash in a safe, unattended, in an inconspicuous, publicly accessible place.

Comment: Re:Startups Aren't Really Job-Creators In Practice (Score 2) 303

Tech startups don't create the kinds of jobs that the 99% actually need. Oh, sure, many of them will eventually hire one secretary, and will pay into their building's contract for one part-time janitor.

I have to admit that saying they're jobs we don't need sounds a bit misguided. Who says? Why wouldn't they be? Are you suggesting we shouldn't have a technical work force? That's what it sounds like... but if I were to guess how you'd respond if asked that, you'd say that's not what you're trying to say at all.

That being said, technology already permeates every industry. Even service, manufacturing, construction, and it continues to increase more and more every year. There's a growing need (and gap) in tuning our workforce to be more technical. Hence the growing calls for pushing math, science, and technology in schools. While there will always be a need for blue collar jobs like manufacturing/construction/service for the foreseeable future, those won't last in the same state as they do today either. So it's kind of inevitable. And in reference to exporting those jobs exported oversees, you probably already know the same jobs would only be a 100th in size over here because of the automation we'd employ.

As for taxes in my opinion, we already have a sliding scale that almost works OK. If we could eliminate some "loopholes" - first being special treatment on specific types of income like dividends and capital gains and instead treat them as ordinary income - second eliminate all interest deductions including mortgage interest. I believe those changes alone (allowing for no exceptions) we'd fix 80% of our tax problems and also simplify taxes for everyone across the board.

Comment: Gah... (Score 3, Informative) 401

Regardless of whether or not mankind is fully, partially, or trivially responsible for climate change. Calling it a weapon of mass destruction is fully moronic. It's a distortion of reality for the sole sake of sensationalizing the issue. It's not worth tainting the argument for the sake of getting the point across.

Now it's just a matter of time before we start arresting people for starting bonfires or driving to work. Gas guzzler, hybrid, or all electric you'll all be terrorists wielding WMDs! /tongueincheek

"Pascal is Pascal is Pascal is dog meat." -- M. Devine and P. Larson, Computer Science 340

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