Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Polls on the front page of Slashdot? Is the world coming to an end?! Nope; read more about it. ×

Comment: Junk science (Score 1) 486

by compudj (#49339517) Attached to: No, It's Not Always Quicker To Do Things In Memory

Wow. Has anyone heard about buffered writes ? And does kernel-level page cache ring a bell ? No fsync was ever used in the benchmarks, therefore, it is never actually hitting the disk. The only good thing about this paper is that the Java and Python listings are available at the end, for everyone to identify the basic flaws in this research.

So yeah, it's faster to write directly to MEMORY than to do a copy before writing to MEMORY.

Comment: I can understand why... (Score 1) 681

by alexandre (#49111995) Attached to: Bill Nye Disses "Regular" Software Writers' Science Knowledge

Those who did specialize in computer science early on, after high school let's say, tend to not understand physics / chemistry / biology / etc. as well, and it shows.

That doesn't mean they are anti-science / anti-global-warming or anything like that, just that the rest depends more on ambiant politic than critical use of scientific knowledge when shown scientific studies...

Comment: Re:Remoting status using Wayland? (Score 1) 189

by Mathieu Lutfy (#49056095) Attached to: Wayland 1.7.0 Marks an Important Release

We've moved from displaying remote applications from the xlib level over ssh, to the toolkit level over ssh (as parent described). It's Unix moving forward, finally.

Microsoft's proprietary RDP protocol or alternatives such as VNC work differently (and usually pretty slow, since they work similarly to xlib, passing compressed bitmap images over the wire). If you want a remote desktop and your network link is fast enough, that's fine, but for most cases, toolkit-over-ssh is more secure and efficient.

+ - New LTTng Analyses Tools for Linux

Submitted by compudj
compudj writes: Ever wondered why your program is experiencing spurious latencies ? This blog post about finding the root cause of a web request latency presents a new set of scripts, LTTng Analyses, which allows devops and developers to narrow down the root cause of those latencies, presenting statistics, frequency distribution, logs, and top usage of disk, network, CPU, memory, interrupts, and system calls to the console.

Comment: Re:Java-Free Like NeoOffice? (Score 1) 148

by Mathieu Lutfy (#48936277) Attached to: LibreOffice Gets a Streamlined Makeover With 4.4 Release

I agree, but as far as I know, on Debian it does not depend on Java. The Libre Office requirements page says it is only necessary for certain 'Base' features: http://www.libreoffice.org/get...

(I have never seen the popups, or had Java installed on my machine for a long time, so I was curious. Libre Office also runs pretty fast imho.)

NeoOffice basically stripped it from Base, and their download page says: "Base users: if you use Base, we recommend that you use OpenOffice with the Oracle Report Builder extension. The Base features in NeoOffice 2014.6 are much more limited than OpenOffice." (http://www.neooffice.org/neojava/en/macappstore.php)

Comment: Security is a two way street (Score 1) 396

by alexandre (#48626201) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

You do need HTTPS to protect mundane content: Saying otherwise is very short sighted...

You might not care about the content, but the way someone, somewhere, is accessing it, does offer a lot of "value".
It can allow a watchful eye to either accuse the reader of being outside the norm, criminal, not respectful and whatnot (reason why librarians fought hard for the right to lend books without giving the list to the state!) or allow them to caracterise, profile, target a person over time for many different reasons.

Thus everyone should have the to right to read anonymously and willingly.
Witholding this right from others is being complicit with opressors.

Comment: CiviCRM (Score 2) 104

by Mathieu Lutfy (#48197811) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Event Sign-Up Software Options For a Non-Profit?

They should only go with custom code up to a certain extent. The organization should have the freedom to choose its own service provider (including volunteers). I'm probably stating the obvious, but if there is too much custom code they will be forced to spend a lot to rewrite code when volunteers rotate (and most likely will want to roll their own fancier solution), spend a lot of energy/time/money to maintain the code, or have difficulties finding volunteers who want to get involved in such a mess.

I don't know the specifics of your use-case, but CiviCRM is a Free Software contact relationship management software aimed specifically at non-profits. It has a large community of users and developers. While the community mostly operates on non-profit budgets, it includes users such as the FSF, EFF, Wikimedia, sub-orgs of UNESCO, Amnesty International, NY State Senate, etc. I use it for my small local clients, but I'm happy to be able to pool ressources with such organisations.

While turn-key tools can only do so much, you would probably have better chances of customizing that to fit your needs, and in the long term, the organization can turn to specialized service providers if necessary, without restarting from scratch.

Heck, worst case, if your volunteers are PHP-averse and don't feel like spending too much time customizing the application, you can write just a front-end application to it, and use the CiviCRM REST API to store the data. Writing a whole new application just for that seems like a huge waste of ressources, and does not seem sustainable. An event management tool has a ton of small but critical features to think about.

If they think it will be hard to learn an existing generic tool, imagine how hard it will be for new staff/volunteers to use a completely custom tool. Not to mention that if your organisation has an aim of promoting common good, community building, etc, they should also participate in existing Free Software projects :)

Comment: Re:Crap Traffic (Score 1) 146

by Mathieu Lutfy (#47524569) Attached to: Comcast Carrying 1Tbit/s of IPv6 Internet Traffic

Would be nice to have more details about that, and the proportion with IPv4 scans/crap.

Personally, I've been pleasantly surprised when going to the US, that random places (small motels, AirBNB places) had native IPv6. In some cases, they even had weird broken NAT, but working IPv6.

This migration to IPv6 has to happen one day or another. May as well be in front of the curve, with regards to privacy, security, topology and performance.

Money cannot buy love, nor even friendship.

Working...