Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Why the emphasis on Lets Encrypt? (Score 1) 123

The certificates from Lets Encrypt (and other commonly used cheap providers) are "domain validated", which is the lowest rung of site certificate. These are perfectly okay for everyday use on Internet sites that don't process highly sensitive data.

The best consumers can do is demand extended validation certificates for their banking sites, and each time you connect to your bank's site verify you are using an EV certificate.

Comment Re:NAT is my antivirus (Score 1) 294

Exactly that, in my experience.

You and I, and the OP, won't be subject to any attacks behind our NAT firewalls because we're all too careful to fall for any phishing scams or malware links.

Our coworkers, family and friends, on the other hand... they'll call us and say "hey my machine is acting funny" no matter what kind of firewall they are behind.

Comment NAT (Score 1) 294

Those who think NAT is such a great idea... have you had to support VPN tunnels between networks with overlapping private subnets? It gets messy fast.

Universally unique addressing is a GOOD thing. For those concerned about the security of private networks, well, you have to know what you're doing. And even with ipv4 a lot of internal addresses leak out anyway. (Look at SMTP envelopes for one).

Comment Re:memories, memories (Score 1) 294

I've been trying, it's a bit of a struggle.

Getting my home network on IPv6 was the easiest part. My provider (not Comcast) was no help whatsoever, so I set up a tunnel from HE. Works great. Only time I had to tweak was when my IPv4 endpoint changed addresses, then I login to HE and update my tunnel. The rest of my home network all fell into line, even the mobile devices (iphones mostly) picked up an ipv6 address and use it, but it can be hard to tell since iOS only displays ipv4 info on the wifi settings page.

At work, I don't manage the corporate network, and don't see it moving to ipv6 anytime soon. That's not a barrier for me, except for testing perhaps, though I may be able to configure a tunnel at work as well.

I'm trying to move some of our public sites over, but our data center is handled by a large managed services provider, and they've been dragging their feet for two months on my request to provision ipv6. I don't think they get many requests for it, and I'm not at all sure they know quite how to do it.

It's frustrating to say the least.

Comment Started on SunOS... (Score 1) 162

around 1988. The hardware was a Sun 3 (Motorola 68020 CPU), the console ran SunView (I think we installed X11 later). Shortly after that I began dabbling in Minix on an 8086 machine at home, later installed Coherent on a 386. Didn't try Linux until I bought a distro from SLS, it had 0.99pl14 and the box came with about 30 floppy disks.

On my next job I was an AIX admin. It was another 10 years before I was working with Linux full time.

Comment Re: It's like Venezuela but without all the gun cr (Score 3, Informative) 431

Sorry, but you are incorrect. Greece reported a nearly 2 billion euro surplus in 2014, without taking interest payments into account. http://www.wsj.com/articles/greece-misses-target-on-budget-surplus-1421244654

If their debt were wiped out today they would keep that money and need no further bailouts. Better yet they could go back to the Drachma and manage their currency with a combination of monetary and fiscal policy, just like every other sovereign nation in the developed world.

You can't oversimplify the Greek situation as "socialism". There are plenty of examples of countries that are doing fine economically with policies that embrace social spending. The Greek situation is far more complex and involves politics and the Euro as much as anything else.

Comment Re:It is Absurd... (Score 1) 1032

This person earned their degree decades ago. We were relatively naive back then. Then came the S&L crisis, the dot-com bubble (and burst), housing bubble, and the GFC.

It's easy to be an idealist entering school. Earn your degree, get a job, work your way up, earn a six-figure income within 10 years of graduation. With those expectations, it's easy to see how a $50-$75k loan will be repaid. Until the economy tanks, or you can't a job, or you are chronically underemployed perhaps because you don't find a job within your field.

Having lived through the good times and the hard times, I have a lot of perspective on the economy that I wouldn't expect from any 18 year old.

Comment Re:8% (Score 2) 1032

That's the problem. Interest rates on student loans are usury. Higher than most mortgages and auto loans.

And, for many people this may be the first significant debt they take on, long before they have experience with earning a paycheck and budgeting for debt repayment, or any kind of financial sensibility.

A lot has already been written about personal responsibility, but the thing is, when you are trapped in debt with the prospects of living an austere life of working hard to service interest payments, there are no easy options.

Perhaps the parents should shoulder some blame, but it doesn't seem fair to pass the burden on to the next generation, and yet that is in fact what happens in many instances. Children go without because their parents are mired in debt.

Comment Re:Gigafactories don't start out as Gigafactories (Score 3, Insightful) 116

Yes--Tesla has become a giant vaporware producer. Their fans speak as if Tesla has already cornered the EV and battery storage markets, in reality all they've done is ship a few Model S cars and made various announcements for products we can't yet buy (Model X, Model 3, Powerwall).

Comment Re:Government Intrusion (Score 1) 837

That's part of it. Suspension design also affects wear-and-tear, as does heavy braking or acceleration. And the average number of passengers in a vehicle is probably a bigger factor than anything else in vehicle weight, which doesn't get included into these costs.

Okay, so the "unfair" commentary is a little bit of flame-bait. But I'm astonished at the level of scorn I've seen on EV drivers in public forums. Many EV drivers have already spent far more than other drivers trying to help the environment, paying more for their vehicles (and thus higher sales tax), installing charging stations/solar panels, etc. And some people are fiercely opposed to the $7500 federal tax refunds on ideological grounds. I live in a state where politicians seemingly want us EV drivers not just to pay our fair share for road use, the proposed legislation would have had us pay considerably higher taxes than for other, similar vehicles.

Comment Are gas taxes solely for road repair? (Score 1) 837

I got into an ideological debate on another forum over whether fuel taxes exist solely for road maintenance, or also as a disincentive for consumption due to environmental concerns and preservation of natural resources (oil reserves). There are strong arguments on both sides. On the one hand the money today goes to roads (or is supposed to) and not the environment, on the other if we don't care about pollution we may as well tax by miles driven or vehicle weight, or both.

Slashdot Top Deals

Been Transferred Lately?

Working...