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Comment Re:They already have an agent... (Score 1) 215 215

I would have called it a lawyer.

Based strictly on the premise that a "rock star" isn't looking for a job. They have their own company/app/startup. They want to protect their IP, or get bought out, or frankly run their business the old fashioned way and (presumably) make money. A headhunter won't help you with this, but a lawyer would be critical.

Comment Bad Analogy (Score 1) 546 546

Coder == Carpenter
Degree == Architect

Being able to write code is a skill. You can put together some good stuff, but you wouldn't want them designing a skyscraper.
Now a carpenter who has lots of experience definitely picks up many tricks of the trade and will understand things better. But can they do the math to understand how wind shear should be accounted for, how many elevators are needed for the occupancy, or all of the fire codes? Is that to say an architect can build a beautiful piece of furniture? Not necessarily but a skilled carpenter certainly will.

Now someone with a CS or CE degree will be able to write code, not only from their first year basic course, but having to implement basic algorithms and data structures. Later, they'll get into Design Patterns to understand useful structures. They'll get into OS courses to understand inter-process communications and race conditions. And finally and potentially most importantly, they'll eventually learn how to evaluate their algorithms to ensure they're doing things in the most efficient manner.

Depending on what types of apps you're writing, simply knowing coding can be plenty. But at some scale and/or level of complexity, 4 years of college coupled with an internship/co-op of actual experience will outweigh just coding. Yes, experience will certainly get you there as will lots of personal motivation and curiosity. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of kick ass carpenters but sometimes you need something more.

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Fine Print Says Game Store Owns Your Soul 262 262

mr_sifter writes "UK games retailer GameStation revealed that it legally owns the souls of thousands of customers, thanks to a clause it secretly added to the online terms and conditions for its website. The 'Immortal Soul Clause' was added as part of an attempt to highlight how few customers read the terms and conditions of an online sale. GameStation claims that 88 percent of customers did not read the clause, which gives legal ownership of the customer's soul over to the UK-based games retailer. The remaining 12 percent of customers however did notice the clause and clicked the relevant opt-out box, netting themselves a £5 GBP gift voucher in the process."

Comment Re:Ouch! (Score 2, Informative) 557 557

Actually, with the 27" iMac you can actually use that as an external monitor. So, you could get yourself an iMac and use it until it's obsolete, then use it merely as a display. Not quite sure if/how you would switch between internal/external source (maybe a KVM switch could work), but you could then turn the iMac into a server when you upgrade to whatever next.

Comment Re:Dual NIC woulda been nice (Score 2, Insightful) 557 557

Dual NIC would have resulted in a fair amount of changes. As it is (as someone mentioned earlier), they just stack in a second drive where the optical drive was. The only other difference is the case doesn't have a slot, and frankly they probably could have left that there too. Otherwise, everything is identical. Now dual NIC, you've changed the back of the case as well. More importantly, you've now changed the motherboard and are now designing 2 computers instead of just 1.

You probably won't get a massive market for this, but this is a simple and cost effective way for Apple to provide a basic server. Now if they'd only go the media center route, give me HDMI out and BluRay, and it would be sitting under my TV the second I could buy one. And really, DVI out is probably ok for that, so they could do the exact same thing and just offer me BluRay.

Comment Re:Lack of bandwidth is not Apple's fault (Score 4, Interesting) 551 551

Said it once, and I'll say it again. CDMA is a dead end, the world is moving to LTE. Why would anyone waste their resources on a technology with such a limited lifespan. Globally there are significantly more GSM networks than CDMA, and GSM is a natural transition to LTE. Until Verizon supports LTE (which won't be all that long), you won't see the iPhone there. Period.

Sure, they could have opened up to more carriers in the US, like T-Mobile. But look, I'm sure AT&T offered them gobs of money to be exclusive. And yeah, AT&T's network has been, well, terrible, but did that stop everyone from upgrading to the iPhone 3G when it came out?

I've been thinking about this article since I read it yesterday, and I think AT&T just screwed up their pricing model. Maybe their estimates were completely off on what they thought people would use for data. Maybe it is partially Apple's fault because they dictated some pricing terms (I do not have any idea). But if you look at simple economics, AT&T vastly misjudged the demand for data on their network versus the supply. It is understandable, previous smartphones couldn't do as much as easily or eloquently. AT&T should have charged more for an unlimited plan, and tiered pricing for capped services. As it is, they're leaving money on the table that could have been used to truly upgrade their networks. Is AT&T's cell plan cheap, not really, but would that have stopped people? Sure, there's an upper bound, but I believe AT&T's pricing is well below that.

Comment Re:cat and mouse (Score 5, Insightful) 396 396

You buy the Apple products because you LIKE the Apple products, and you LIKE the way they work together.

Now PalmPre starts syncing with iTunes, but doesn't sync right. That will look bad on Apple. Let's say the PalmPre somehow effs up your library. That will look bad on Apple. Sure, Apple can say 'we don't support the Pre' but if you're music library is hosed you're going to be mad at Apple.

Look at the Motorola Rokr, they licensed the technology from Apple to allow it to Sync. And Apple guaranteed it would work right and not screw anything up. I'm actually surprised (for better or worse) that Apple hasn't invoked the DCMA.

What Apple does NOT want to do is become Windows and have to support 80 billion solutions under the sun. Their strength is and always has been tight integration. Having to lose focus on that and suddenly deal with problems with every Tom, Dick, and Harry syncing with iTunes will delay new features and products.

Comment Re:Bashing Competitors (Score 1) 770 770

No one remembers "Redmond, fire up your copiers" ???

Yes, since Apple has had a resurgence they have been cocky. But hey, they make some pretty decent hardware, that works extremely well with their software and other accessory products. Microsoft's done the same.

Is it 'appropriate'? Tough call, I think a lot of old school Apple die hards still feel like the underdog and so they enjoy bragging a bit. And Wall Street loves its brash, obnoxious characters in general.

Comment Re:Work first, then get an MBA (Score 1) 834 834

You're suggesting 4 years of schooling to be in a job for 4 years...to then go back to school for 2 more years to do something completely different. Ummm, why not just get the MBA to begin with.

Yes, a lot of engineers go MBA, or the consulting route. But if you're going to get an MBA after 4-5 years, why waste the time getting an engineering degree and working in the industry. Sure, technical knowledge will make you a better manager, but the timelines you lay out sound like a waste to me.

Comment MS worked for me (Score 1) 834 834

Contrary to others, an MS in Computer Engineering directly translated to both a higher job rank and salary over people hired at the exact same time at the same company. Regardless, I got my MS because it was a 5 year BS/MS program, and I felt it would be something additional to help set myself apart from everyone else. Used to be a college degree set you apart, but I didn't feel that was quite the case anymore.

On a more practical note, consider the job market and economy at the moment. If you believe things will improve, then why not hide out in academics and learn more, especially if you think you'll want a MS. You don't want to come back in 5-10 years, have to take the GRE, and change your lifestyle from that nice cushy salaried life to going back to ramen. Plus you could have a family by then further limiting your options.

As for job experience, co-op education and interning are great for that (but you may be a bit late). What you don't want is to graduate and waste a year looking for a job. Or getting a job an getting laid off a year or two later. I, for one, would not want to be entering the job market today.

Comment Re:Verizon rejected.... (Score 1) 237 237

Just swap out the modem, change some code, EASY! How's that go?
1. Swap out modem
2. ???
3. Profit!

No, actually it's not. Sure, if Apple did things right it would be relatively easy, but it's going to take time and effort. For a dead technology with a limited market.

When VZW goes LTE, then the iPhone will technically work on their network. Of course, the carriers and/or Apple will likely try to keep the phone on whatever network it's supposed to be on.

... when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. -- Fred Brooks

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