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Comment: Re:Alternatives (Score 1) 242

by ciscoguy01 (#46693975) Attached to: Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS
I also donated to everydns.net, and I used them for years.
Then Dyn bought them, made a big show of keeping the everydns promise to us. "It'll always be free".
Then they asked for money, I think it was $10, which I paid.

I have them on a few domains, and they have kept my free acct active after I paid them.
The token payment was to separate the slackers from those that were willing to pay at least a little, which meant you were still actually using the service.
I am sure it wasn't the money.

Dyn does have a history of buying their free competitors. To get rid of them.
One thing about them, they are not nice guys. Not at all.

Comment: Should an asset have value? (Score 1) 393

by ciscoguy01 (#42945445) Attached to: The End Is Near for GameStop
The problem here is one of philosophy.
When you buy something and pay for it, should it be *yours*.
Shouldn't any valuable asset be just that, a valuable asset?

This is going on all over, some companies want you to buy their new products, sometimes for thousands of dollars and if you later on decide you don't want/need it you should destroy it rather than put it on ebay and sell it to someone who does. Barracuda products come to mind.
I for one don't believe in buying anything that has *no resale value*. I insist things I buy have value. I don't buy from any company that tries to interfere with that inherent value.

Every asset should have value. If a company through their policies or through technological means tries to interfere with that inherent value you should avoid buying their worthless stuff. They want you to buy it from them but they later on try to take the value away from you, the solution is to not buy from them!
It's no different in the game industry. If you can't sell it if you don't want it, you should just not buy it in the first place.
The company would then have to change their business policies or go out of business.
If the Xbox 720 is going to prevent your assets from having value, just don't buy it. Maybe rent it, like World of Warcraft.

Comment: Re:Regarding price "gouging"... (Score 1) 303

by ciscoguy01 (#41869413) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Deal With a DDoS Attack?
But if Rackspace is the ISP, and the ISP presumably has other customers, doesn't a DDOS often affect other customers of that ISP? I think so. Rackspace would have to mitigate the attack, no fair trying to charge one customer. Unless they took on a well known target customer, that is.

Let me tell a story. Some years ago (long ago, really) I was working on some antispam stuff.
There was a popular free DNSBL that was being DDOSed all the darned time, this affected people's mail, including my customers. Since it was a free list they had little money to do high cost anti-DDOS stuff. Understandable.

I contacted one of the big distributed hosting providers, a name you would know.
I asked one of their top people if the company would agree to provide hosting for that DNSBL, for the good of the internet. As a way of helping. The processes involved would be a tiny blip for a company their size. Others would maintain it, they just had to allow the queries. A tiny blip of DNS lookups for incoming mail.

I got an immediate response that this was an interesting request but they couldn't get involved in anything that would draw unwanted attention from bad people, because it could affect their shareholders. Understandable.
I responded that I would appreciate them helping but I understand. And how long would it be before they were themselves targeted and extorted by criminals? I got no response.

It wasn't long, I think less than a year they did have some criminals attempt to extort them under threat of DDOS. It was in the news.
I am sure they were able to handle it internally, they were big and had a big distributed system. But this just shows, you have to help if you can, or what happens when they come for you?

Like I said, I understand they don't want to take on a known target. But the stuff in the OP was nothing like that.

Comment: Re:Changes incoming (Score 1) 148

by ciscoguy01 (#41865261) Attached to: Court Rules Website Terms of Service Agreement Completely Invalid

Thought so - you have no clue what you're on about. Clearly you won't listen to sense, so go ahead and act like you're being victimised. Me, I'll continue to treat both the device and the service as different. Even better, I'll rest easy in the knowledge UK law states I cannot sign my rights away, even if I wanted to on any ToS.

I bet, but only since you are in the UK.
We are talking about how companies (like Microsoft discussed in this thread) are loathe to have people suing them, so have instituted forced arbitration and the class action waiver.
Naturally you don't have that problem in the UK like we do in the US.
You have loser pays!
I imagine it's much more dangerous suing someone in the UK than it is here.
Here, you get a lawyer on contingent fee, and it costs you nothing. You sue, most of the time you get a settlement, and the defendant pays.
In the UK, however, if you are outlawyered, have abuse of discovery, have witnesses lying, there could be a million reasons, and you ultimately are not able to win the case you have to pay the other side's legal fees.
That doesn't happen here in the US. Lawsuits are FREE here!
Not that loser pays is a panacea. Notice that thing about the the tvshack guy, Richard O'Dwyer, he is really being dragged through it over there. All he ran was a search engine.

Comment: Re:Changes incoming (Score 1) 148

by ciscoguy01 (#41856817) Attached to: Court Rules Website Terms of Service Agreement Completely Invalid

but what if you bought a quad core computer 2 years ago, and they sent out a signal that disabled three of those cores unless you pay a monthly fee

And now you're comparing apples to Alpha Centauri. You still haven't realised that Live is an added bonus you pay for separately, so it's subject to different terms.

Nah, it's the same thing.

When I bought the Xbox 360 I got Xbox live at the same time because that was what I bought into when I bought the hardware. Access to the network. I still have access to the network but on not nearly as favorable terms.

Are you all this quick to give up your rights in the UK? We don't go for that in the US.

Comment: Re:Keyboard evolution stopped with the Model M! (Score 1) 201

by ciscoguy01 (#41856337) Attached to: The Evolution of the Computer Keyboard
Ya know, the Model M keyboard cords came any way you wanted them.
I have some with short cords like you describe, and I have some with cords 10' long. They made whatever you needed. It's not a replacement for a wireless keyboard, but they do serve different purposes.
You want clicky, definite keypresses and you don't mind the sound, or you want to be able to sit back on the couch.

Comment: Re:Keyboard evolution stopped with the Model M! (Score 3) 201

by ciscoguy01 (#41856299) Attached to: The Evolution of the Computer Keyboard
What's interesting about that is IBM made nearly all the typewriters, and they made those keycaps to last because that was the right thing to do.
They didn't do it because of competition- they had almost none. They owned 90% of the market.
They didn't do it because anyone demanded it.
They did it because it was the product they wanted to make. Designed to last, to perform better than the market even demanded.
Contrast that to how things are designed and made today.
Cheaper, obsolescent, designed to fail sooner rather than later. To make you buy a new one. It's sad really.

Comment: Re:As I sit here typing on a 28 year old keyboard. (Score 2) 201

by ciscoguy01 (#41856207) Attached to: The Evolution of the Computer Keyboard
You probably made the ones for the IBM typewriters, I remember, "Double shot molded".
You see, our forefathers knew what was necessary, they made things to last.
Now, you buy a keyboard and in 6 months the home row keys are worn off.
30 or 40 years ago you'd buy a washer, dryer or refrigerator and in 25 years it was still working.
Now, you're lucky if it lasts 5 years. They know it too, they have MBAs at the factory working on cheapening the parts to make them fail, so you will buy another.
Whereas years ago, they'd *never* have sold you something that would not last. Our whole society is like that. It's sad.

Comment: Re:Changes incoming (Score 1) 148

by ciscoguy01 (#41854779) Attached to: Court Rules Website Terms of Service Agreement Completely Invalid
I bought the system to get the online services too.
Now I am being cheated out of that.
Not that I can't still use it, I can. But not on the same terms in effect when I bought it.
Not what I call fair.
I don't use analogies in /., but what if you bought a quad core computer 2 years ago, and they sent out a signal that disabled three of those cores unless you pay a monthly fee? You think that'd be ok? And there were no rules when you bought the thing, or none that affected you. And now there are. And they already got your money.

"Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

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