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Comment: Re:Talk about conflicted... (Score 1) 1746

by chefmonkey (#46654417) Attached to: Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

You've triggered my "someone is wrong on the Internet" reaction again. You can play humpty-dumpty all you want, claiming words mean what you say they mean when you use them, but the term "public company" has a very specific meaning: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P...

In any case, my point here -- the reason that it's important to keep in mind that Mozilla is *not* a public company -- is that the rampage against Mozilla wasn't an attempt to hurt some corporate profit machine to compel it to act. It was an intentionally-inflicted tragedy of the commons, designed to damage a public good because some people thought that the collateral damage of destroying a nonprofit was an acceptable trade-off for making this specific point.

Comment: Re:I think this is bullshit (Score 1) 1746

by chefmonkey (#46653951) Attached to: Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

This displeasure was large enough to have him removed from Mozilla.

The board and executives would have kept him on -- he was not forced out by the company. He left because certain members the public wanted to burn him at the stake, and didn't care about the collateral damage their campaign was doing to Mozilla. And he wasn't willing to hang around and let that damage continue.

Comment: Re:I think this is bullshit (Score 1) 1746

by chefmonkey (#46653787) Attached to: Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

To be clear, no one in a position of power other than Brendan decided that Brendan should step down and leave. This was Brendan's decision. The crucifixion of Brendan was done at the hands of the public, and he left to prevent further damage to the project. This has nothing to do with the operation of a private business, unless your position is that Mozilla should have continued to employ Brendan against his will.

Comment: And, for the counterpoints (Score 5, Informative) 824

by chefmonkey (#46596983) Attached to: Some Mozilla Employees Demand New CEO Step Down

A homosexual Mozilla employee's take on the topic: http://subfictional.com/2014/0...
A statement from Mitch Baker, Mozilla chairperson: https://blog.lizardwrangler.co...
A statement from Brendan himself: https://brendaneich.com/2014/0...
An official Mozilla statement on its policy regarding employee and contributor diversity: https://blog.mozilla.org/press...

Comment: Re:so tell me again... (Score 4, Insightful) 476

by chefmonkey (#45302059) Attached to: Microsoft, Apple and Others Launch Huge Patent Strike at Android

Also FTFA:

And because it’s independent, it can antagonize its owners’ partners and customers in ways that its owner companies could not. “The principals have plausible deniability,” says Thomas Ewing, an attorney and intellectual property consultant. “They can say with a straight face: ‘They’re an independent company. We don’t control them.’ And there’s some truth to that.”

Comment: Re:so tell me again... (Score 4, Insightful) 476

by chefmonkey (#45301549) Attached to: Microsoft, Apple and Others Launch Huge Patent Strike at Android

Google's own patent bank doesn't matter, because Rockstar Consortium doesn't do anything other than undermine the very fabric of the tech industry for their own gain. They exist only to collect rent on innovation itself. FTFA: "'Pretty much anybody out there is infringing,' says John Veschi, Rockstar’s CEO. 'It would be hard for me to envision that there are high-tech companies out there that don’t use some of the patents in our portfolio.'"

To spell it out more clearly, Google can't sue Rockstar over patent infringement, because Rockstar doesn't actually do anything that Google would have a patent on (unless Google owns some "Method and Process for Utterly Crippling the Tech Industry Using Patent Lawsuits" business process patent we don't know about).

The timing couldn't be better. We finally have the first credible effort in U.S. Congress to re-evaluate how patents are handled (http://eshoo.house.gov/press-releases/eshoo-introduces-patent-litigation-reform-bill/), and couldn't have crafted a better supervillian than Rockstar if we tried. They even have a comically bombastic name to put a cherry on top of their already odious persona.

Comment: Re:Oh, goody, I can "consume" silent movies now... (Score 2) 95

by chefmonkey (#45288343) Attached to: Cisco Releases Open Source "Binary Module" For H.264 In WebRTC

Well, keep in mind that an MTI video codec is mostly intended to serve the purpose of preventing complete failures to negotiate. Also, the MTI that 's being proposed in the IETF is H.264 baseline, which is a far sight worse than VP8 by pretty much every metric imaginable. If H.264 baseline is selected as MTI, then I would imagine that the existing implementations will continue to offer VP8 in preference to H.264 baseline, and fall back to H.264 baseline only as an emergency backup "codec of last resort".

As far as Opus is concerned, both Firefox and Chrome currently use Opus as their preferred audio codec for WebRTC, and have since day one. Opus was a relatively uncontroversial choice as the MTI codec, so I suspect any other interested parties will be happy to do the same.

In terms of Opus support for the audio element... well, try it out for yourself. Put this in an arbitrary HTML file, load it up in Firefox, and see what you get: <audio src="http://radioserver1.delfa.net:80/256.opus" controls/>

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

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