Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

+ - Community of Hacker Dojo raises a Kickstarter!->

Submitted by c0sine
c0sine (959434) writes "For those who do not know. Hacker Dojo is one of the premier hacker / co-working / community spaces in the San Francisco Bay area. It is a member run and operated; and open to general public — center full of technologists, entrepreneurs and gurus. On top of contributing to the local community HackerDojo.com also provides information, software and other resources for anyone interested in starting or running a (non affiliated) hackerspace.
Recently the City of Mountain View, concerned that the space is not zoned for teaching classes, has shut down more than half the space, stopped all large classes and conferences, and has given Hacker Dojo 6 months to do a quarter million dollars of improvements or face being shut down.
Their fundraising total is now ~$170K out of $250K. The kickstarter goes for 10 more days. Here is a recent article about them in Venture Beat (http://venturebeat.com/2012/08/10/hacker-dojo-interview/)"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Even more useless... (Score 1) 457

by c0sine (#30966382) Attached to: Gun With Wireless Arming Signal Goes On Sale Soon
Not particularly true, actually. Yes, 7.62 round can and in many cases will go through a body. However, the bullet delivers about 2KJ of energy at the impact point. Which momentarily creates so called hydrostatic shock... And you, perhaps, know the rest. So, the moral of the story: 7.62x39 caliber is very bad one. And unlike 5.56mm it goes through any bushes, Kevlar body armor and all that crap :-)

Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it.

Working...