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Comment: Re:Errors, what do we do (Score 1) 230

by byteherder (#47101583) Attached to: The Flaw Lurking In Every Deep Neural Net

We have trusted the computer to do math perfectly.

Its none ideal to have a single computational route and unit on safety critical systems.

I agree, the space shuttle had backup and redundancy for all the safety critical systems.
'We have trusted the computer to do math perfectly.' and then along can the Pentium Bug.

Comment: Errors, what do we do (Score 1) 230

by byteherder (#47099165) Attached to: The Flaw Lurking In Every Deep Neural Net
We know there will be errors with the neural nets. There will be edge cases (like the one described with the cat), corner cases, bizarre combination of inputs that result in misclassifications, wrong answers and bad results. This happens in the real world too. People misclassify things, get things wrong, screw up answers.

The lesson is not to trust the computer to be infallible. We have trusted the computer to do math perfectly. 1 + 1 = 2, always, but is not so for neural nets. It is one thing if the neural net will not tag the photo of your cat on Facebook even if there are 100 other pictures of your cat on your account. It is another if your photo get misidentified as being a terrorist on the "kill on sight" list.

The question is what do we do with the errors?

Comment: No Deterrence (Score 2) 108

by byteherder (#46844285) Attached to: Apple, Google Agree To Settle Lawsuit Alleging Hiring Conspiracy
If I was a CEO of a Tech company, I would be calling up all the other CEOs and saying, "Let's do this again". Why? $2.7 billion reason why.

Apple, Google, Intel, and Adobe conspired to hold down salaries of their employees, saving their respective companies $3 billion. When they got caught, they paid a $300million settlement and walked away. Net saving $2.7 billion. No admission of guilt, no one goes to jail, no one gets fired.

There is no deterrence for them to not do it again. No penalty, just a slap on the wrist. The penalty has to be at least the damage down in real terms. When you conspire to do something illegal and they only penalty is that you make $2.7 more in profit, you will never, never stop this behavior.

Comment: Re:Million Dollars (Score 1) 467

by byteherder (#46774509) Attached to: Survey: 56 Percent of US Developers Expect To Become Millionaires

Not exactly instant if it takes 30 years.

Not exactly instantly but it is typical of how people purchase a home.

Plus you're going to end up paying 3 million when interest is included with that principal, so your plan actually requires someone to pay 3 million in order to have 1 million.

Actually you will only be paying $616,560.88 total interest with a 3.5% mortgage over 30 years, $1,616,560.88 in total payments. The upside is that you are not paying rent and you get 30 years of appreciation in the home. Look at the price of home 30 years ago and compare them with today. That $1 million home could be worth $3-5 million.

Comment: Re:A million is easy (Score 1) 467

by byteherder (#46774405) Attached to: Survey: 56 Percent of US Developers Expect To Become Millionaires

Except 401k, IRA, and S&P500 index funds don't pay interest.

S&P 500 does not pay interest but it does pay dividends, currently around 2%. 401k and IRA can pay interest depending on what they are invested in. You are never going to reach $1million if you rely solely on traditional savings accounts paying 1%. If you limit your investment choices to only the safest ones, you will always get the lowest returns.

Compound that all you want and you're still going nowhere in a hurry.

Compounding is exactly what I want. 10% compounded over 7 years doubles my investment, 7 more years and it doubles again. With enough time all those doubles will turn a small investment into a large one.

Comment: A million is easy (Score 4, Insightful) 467

by byteherder (#46772437) Attached to: Survey: 56 Percent of US Developers Expect To Become Millionaires
If you can't find a way to get to a million by retirement, something is wrong.

Here is a simple way to do it. Put $16,000 in your 401k and $5,000 in your IRA every year. Investing in a good S&P500 index fund which will return about 10%. In 18 years, you will be a millionaire.

Now getting to $10 million is tough.

Comment: One answer (Score 1) 162

by byteherder (#46684215) Attached to: Judge (Tech) Advice By Results
What happened to the one question per post rule? That should apply to the OP too.

I am only going to answer one of the questions. " ... the metric by which ...(I)... usually judge tech advice"
I judge tech advice (and most advice) by asking if the person giving the advice has done it before. If I am trying to set up a webserver, I will take the advice of someone who sets them up for a living over someone who has just read the manual. There is little substitute for practical hands-on experience.

That goes for a lot of other things in life too, skydiving, race car driving, investing, dating, scuba diving. fire walking.
;-)

Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of everything and the Wirth of nothing?

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