Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:aaargh! pinheads in the IT. (Score 1) 211

by jawtheshark (#47506759) Attached to: Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads
Why would you think that? I use it here for internal web apps, I don't care about their youporn visits and I don't want that on my network. So, if they're at home, let them connect to the VPN, access the internal apps and do their work and wank on the side using their own Internet connection.

Comment: Re:It is good verbally (Score 1) 4

by insanecarbonbasedlif (#47502497) Attached to: Phrase: It is interesting to note

So, be aware of your audience?

Or, beware your audience. Though on the topic, while it's not the most concise construction, signposting something you find interesting so that the reader pays extra attention (or even just a different kind of attention) to it is certainly common. I don't know if that makes it acceptable, but I tend to think it does.

Comment: Drugs are bad, War is far damn worse! (Score 1) 465

War on drugs causes and sustains:
        Criminal underground economics
                Government corruption financing / bribes.
                Bank crimes of money laundering and tax evasion
                Law enforcement personnel deaths and disabilities
                Low income communities’ exploitation / enslavement
                More ....
        Public health / welfare catastrophes
                Spreads diseases HIV, hepatitis, most STDs ...
                Gang, paramilitary, gun ... violence
                Long-term hospitalizations / care
                More ....
        Political / Cultural inequality, excuses, bigotry
                Excuses for underfunding schools
                Depressed neighborhood economics
                Bad teachers ... few police ... no jobs ....
        Criminal exploitation of citizens ....
        Death of generations ....

Comment: Re:Technology is only a small part of the problem (Score 1) 124

by Sloppy (#47500695) Attached to: Snowden Seeks To Develop Anti-Surveillance Technologies

It's a small part, but it's a part. I think Snowden has done his fair share of trying to inform laymen and stir up giving-a-fuck. If he wants to switch to working on tech, he could accomplish nothing and still come out far ahead of the rest of us. ;-)

The existence of a decent open-source router can't do much against a U.S. National Security Letter.

While we certain should care enough to force our government to stop being our adversary, there will always nevertheless be adversaries. You have to work on the tech, too. Even if you totally fixed the US government, Americans would still have to worry about other governments (and non-government parties, such as common criminals, nosey snoops, etc), where you have no vote at all. You will never, ever have a total social/civic solution which relies on, say, 4th Amendment enforcement to keep your privacy. I'm not saying your chances are slim; I'm saying they're literally 0%.

Furthermore, getting our tech more acceptable to layment acually would correct some of the problems inherent with NSLs, improving the situation even in a we-still-don't-give-a-fuck society. If you do things right, then the person they send the NSL to, is the surveillance target. The reason NSLs (coercion with silence) works is that people unnecessarily put too much trust into the wrong places.

For example, Bob sends plaintext love letters to Alice, so anyone who delivers or stores the love letters, can be coerced into giving up the contents. OTOH if they did email right, then if someone wanted to read the email Bob sent to Alice, they'd have to visit Bob or Alice. That squashes the most egregious part of NSLs, where the victim doesn't even get to know they're under attack.

That's true whether we're talking about email, or even if Bob and Alice get secure routers and VPN to each other. One of them gets the NSL ordering them to install malware on their router.

Comment: Re:New SSL root certificate authority (Score 2) 124

by Sloppy (#47500451) Attached to: Snowden Seeks To Develop Anti-Surveillance Technologies

A nice step ahead would be the establishment of a new set of root certificates...

The lesson of CA failure is that there shouldn't be root authorities. Users (or the people who set things up for them, in the case of novices) should be deciding whom they trust and how much, and certificates should be signed by many different parties, in the hopes that some of them are trusted by the person who uses it.

If you want to catch up to ~1990 tech, then you need to remove the "A" in "CA."

Comment: Lame article (Score 1) 176

by Sloppy (#47500367) Attached to: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Amiga 2000

Clicked (thought submitter screwed up the link and linked to a page that links to the article, rather than linking to the article), expecting to find a story about a forgotten A2000: maybe someone walked into an office in 2014 and saw that one was in use. Or someone knocked down a wall in 2014 and found one bricked up but still powered up. Instead, found a page telling everyone what A2000s are. Duh. Where's the "forgotten" part? All that I can tell that was forgotten, is that the writer forgot his elementary school spelling and punctuation lessons.

Comment: Re:Require H1-B visa recipients be paid more (Score 1) 514

Well for one, the AMA is a private organization, and they have tried, and failed to do what you are saying for another similar undertaking that sounds simple but is not.

The problem is that job descriptions are not uniform, and wages are not uniform. So the very thing you are trying to accomplish is technically challenging, and it will be prone to be difficult and challenging circumstances.

Plus, there is every incentive to cheat the system and a bad incentive structure to root out cheating. It's bound to fail, whether or not it's private or public.

Real programs don't eat cache.

Working...