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Comment Re:And yet somehow (Score 1) 237

This may be somewhat cultural... My experiences here in northern Europe are that engineers are respected and paid accordingly.

Based on what I read on /. and other tech sites, it seems that the US in general has neglected the sciences for the last few decades, which may explain the status of the engineering profession.

Comment Patents (Score 2) 218

RIM may not have a future as an independent company, but they should still be able to fetch a good price. They've got a nice fat patent portfolio, and likely also a nice portfolio of enterprise customers that are too locked-in to be switching from BB anytime soon.

Comment Ask them to program something specific (Score 3, Insightful) 672

I guess we combine the two approaches: we send our candidates small coding problems to solve. So we see real code they create and have a standardized way of comparing it to what other candidates have provided.

It works really well at filtering out people we don't want to waste time talking to, and gives us a starting point for the technical interview. It isn't useful for deciding whether or not a candidate should be hired, since there are many other factors that come into play.

Comment Re:Please. (Score 1) 319

Well, I wouldn't put Ekstra Bladet in the same bin as the National Enquirer - they may not have the journalistic integrity of a "real" newspaper, but their stories are generally not completely made up. Sure, it's mostly entertainment, but let's face the facts: many Danes use Ekstra Bladet and BT as their main source of news, however irresponsible that may be.

But all of that is glossing over the real issue here, which is how Apple runs their app store. Like them or not, Ekstra Bladet's app should not have been rejected. Their content is nothing that would ever be censored in Denmark, so they should have some recourse when Apple rejects their app.

The "millions" comment was (I thought) obviously sarcastic. There is very little overlap between the Slashdot readers and potential customers of Ekstra Bladet, so I don't see how anyone could think this article was slashvertisement.

Comment Re:It's a good point (Score 1) 319

You're oversimplifying things. Jailbreaking your phone or switching to a different device are much larger steps than simply finding another newsstand.

Following with the analogy, jailbreaking would be like finding an underground distributor of the newspaper, potentially breaking the law in order to buy the publication. Switching devices would be like moving to another city where the publication isn't banned.

The iPhone isn't quite as standard as Windows on PCs, but think of what would happen if Microsoft decided that you could only install apps on Windows 8 from their own app store.

I understand their reasons for wanting to do it, but like it or not, Apple is being anti-competitive by refusing to allow alternatives to their own app store. And as this is exactly the kind of thing that European courts don't like, this should be interesting to follow.

We all agree on the necessity of compromise. We just can't agree on when it's necessary to compromise. -- Larry Wall