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Comment: Re:Broken Link (Score 1) 124

by briglass (#44549319) Attached to: Playing StarCraft Could Boost Your Cognitive Flexibility
Heh -- well, it's probably been about a decade since I spent serious time on here. Kinda odd that while in the firehose the url changed 3 or 4 times, at least it ended up with this one, instead of the one instance where it was the url below concatenated 3 times in a row Again: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ulterior-motives/201308/can-video-games-make-you-smart-or-least-more-flexible

+ - Playing StarCraft Could Boost Your Cognitive Flexibility->

Submitted by briglass
briglass (608949) writes "Imagine being a total non-gamer and then suddenly playing an hour of StarCraft a day for almost two months. A new study of mine demonstrates that a group of female gaming novices (seriously novice, as in 0 to 1 hour of gaming per week novice) demonstrated increased cognitive flexibility after playing StarCraft, a sort of fast-paced chess on steroids — the control group played The Sims. It's been well known that video gaming can lead to psychological benefits, such as faster perceptual information processing after playing first-person shooter games. But this new study, published in PLOS ONE, shows that video gaming can also affect higher-level cognitive functions. The StarCraft game was customized to be adaptive and remain challenging as the newly minted gamers honed their skills, and in-game behavior was recorded to determine what aspects of StarCraft leads to the boost in flexibility."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Circularity (Score 1) 1064

by briglass (#27037385) Attached to: Why Doctors Hate Science
If doctors are upset by this and believe that their medicine works better, then they ought to use the circularity of the concept of "empirically supported treatment" to their benefit. In other words, if it is in fact the case that some other system of treatment works better than the "empirically supported treatment", then it should be able to be shown-- empirically-- and thus BECOME the empirically supported treatment.

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