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Comment: Finish it already. (Score 5, Informative) 1027

by boshi (#40324161) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's Your Beef With Windows Phone?
We can't keep waiting for 'the next version' of windows phone to fix the problems with the OS. It needs the multitasking fixed on major apps, it needs the scrolling bugs fixed. It needs a lot of minor things fixed that have been problems for years now.
People like a phone OS for what it can do, not what the next update promises to bring. Then there is the issue of Apollo even being able to run on current hardware.

Comment: Software support (Score 0) 565

by boshi (#40265669) Attached to: Where Are All the High-Resolution Desktop Displays?
The reason we don't have easily available high resolution desktop displays is very simple: software support. Current popular operating systems have so many hard-coded UI elements that do not scale easily or reliably that if a 20" 326dpi monitor were available you would not be able to use it with Windows, OSX, or Linux ( maybe linux with massive tweaking ) unless it came with a huge magnifying glass so you could see the UI elements that refuse to scale.

Comment: Re:What's the problem with building self-sustainin (Score 4, Insightful) 248

by boshi (#40106549) Attached to: Neil Armstrong Gives Rare Interview
I think this line of reasoning is very short-sighted. History is filled with examples of discoveries made by accident while trying to push the boundaries of a field. How do you know that a more permanent presence on the moon wouldn't lead to the next major breakthrough?

To think that we can learn everything that we need to by doing all of our experiments at the bottom of a gravity well in our own tiny little corner of the solar system is absurd.

Comment: Re:And dont you DARE close your eyes or not listen (Score 1) 578

by boshi (#40106491) Attached to: Fox Sues Dish Over "Auto Hop" Ad-Skipping Feature
One thing to consider is that this does not skip all commercials all the time. It only skips commercials on certain prime-time shows and it will only do it after about 1AM the following morning. As far as I can tell this is because the feature is human-powered and the data gets pushed to the units after someone has had time to sit down and mark the commercials.

Comment: GPUs continue to take off ( this time literally ) (Score 3, Interesting) 111

by boshi (#40097473) Attached to: "Part-Time" Scientists Aim To Build Autonomous Moon Rover
It seems like every month now that I wake up in the morning and see another amazing application for GPUs. It is incredible to see the progress that a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry can bring to other markets like space exploration that would normally run on super expensive first-generation prototype hardware.

Comment: Re:If you're too lazy to RTFA... (Score 0) 216

by boshi (#29728491) Attached to: Intel Caught Cheating In 3DMark Benchmark
It seems entirely reasonable to me for them to optimize the driver to run particular programs faster if at all possible. I would only consider this cheating if the software is not being rendered entirely ( I think nvidia did this? ), or if it somehow degraded the play experience ( such as jerky with higher average framerates versus smooth with lower average frame rates ). By this logic, would the special drivers ( like SLI or crossfire ) that have to be optimized per application also be cheating?

Comment: Re:Maybe TF2 for inspiration? (Score 5, Interesting) 202

by boshi (#28658155) Attached to: Why Video Games Are Having a Harder Time With Humor
This is well demonstrated in Penny Arcade's series of games "On the Rainslick Precipice of Darkness". The artistic quality of the game improved my enjoyment of it far more than the high polygon counts of modern shooters and other such games.

I think that with the success of games like this and the latest Paper Mario games we are finally starting to see that it's the story and artwork that we are paying for, the technology is secondary. I hope the future holds more games with a strong story focus like these and Silicon Knights' Eternal Darkness.

Comment: Re:js rendering is not the bottleneck (Score 2, Insightful) 381

by boshi (#28047307) Attached to: Google Releases Chrome V2.0
Google also serves image ads, and I'm pretty sure I've even seen some flash ads, though I could be wrong about the last one.

I also think you are confused about how google ads work, or adblock works, because it is quite simple in adblock to block all google text ads.

Abblock for me is necessary, not because I have an aversion to seeing advertisements, but because I block content which distracts me from the page I am reading. I use adblock, but I do not subscribe the massive "catch-all" lists it tries to get me to install. I simply use it as a tool to remove content that annoys me as I browse.

Comment: Re:Doesn't anyone read the warnings? (Score 4, Interesting) 286

by boshi (#28028803) Attached to: Craigslist Fights Back, Sues SC Atty General
I admit there is a fine line between condoning such activity and trying to make it safer for the parties involved. You could say the same for groups that give out clean needles and groups that feed illegal aliens. Certainly these are activities that shouldn't be going on in the first place, but by keeping them out of sight you make them many times more dangerous.

Comment: Doesn't anyone read the warnings? (Score 2, Interesting) 286

by boshi (#28028559) Attached to: Craigslist Fights Back, Sues SC Atty General
Seriously, there are quite clear click-through warnings on the site, if you don't want to see adult advertising, don't go into that section. As for illegal activity, it's a public forum so you can expect a certain amount of that sort of thing.

This is the sort of thing that is going to go on regardless of the existence of craigslist. Now at least there is some kind of paper trail if something bad goes down ( kidnapping, murder, etc ) since most people don't secure delete their emails, but if we make sure this all keeps out on the street corner at night, it just makes it all that much more dangerous.

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

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