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Comment: Low-hanging fruit (Score 1) 1003

by blakecraw (#38388674) Attached to: Why the NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones
First you fix what you can. Imagine somebody is having a lot of trouble catching a baseball, and it turns out they have the glove on the wrong hand. First, you tell them to put the glove on the correct hand (something anybody can achieve). You don't start by telling them they should "get better" (which is not something that everybody can just do).

Comment: text message price fixing (Score 1) 300

by blakecraw (#28872665) Attached to: Antitrust Pressure Mounts For Wireless Providers
The thing that bothers me the most about the semi(?)-trust that major carriers have is text message pricing. I have a tracfone, and I pay roughly $0.03 per text sent or received (using att's network no less), and similar prices can be achieved with a texting package. If it's not price fixing, it certainly is price gouging (7 times the price because I don't have a texting plan? please).
First Person Shooters (Games)

Activision On Iterating, Innovating Call Of Duty Series 66

Posted by Soulskill
from the check-out-our-flamethrower-it's-kickin-rad dept.
Activision's Noah Heller sat down with Gamasutra to discuss the refinements made in Call of Duty: World at War to keep the popular FPS franchise moving forward. He points to cosmetic things, like realistic burning and the ability to set just about everything in the environment on fire, as well as bigger gameplay improvements, such as making the AI more difficult to beat without having it "cheat." "... the main thing we tried to do is honestly make the placement just more brutal. You've always got an advantage on the enemy; you've been through the level before, you know where they're going to be, but in Veteran mode you're going to find that they're not going to cheat. You're really going to have to be going for headshots using the most effective weaponry. You're going to have to use that bolt-action rifle and aim for the head if you want to take an enemy out at a distance. It's a different sort of gameplay. We heard those concerns and we tried to address them."
Space

Space Litter To Hit Earth Tomorrow 443

Posted by kdawson
from the leave-only-memories-take-only-footprints dept.
A refrigerator-sized tank of toxic ammonia, tossed from the international space station last year, is expected to hit earth tomorrow afternoon or evening. The 1,400-pound object was deliberately jettisoned — by hand — from the ISS's robot arm in July 2007. Since the time of re-entry is uncertain, so is the location. "NASA expects up to 15 pieces of the tank to survive the searing hot temperatures of re-entry, ranging in size from about 1.4 ounces (40 grams) to nearly 40 pounds (17.5 kilograms). ... [T]he largest pieces could slam into the Earth's surface at about 100 mph (161 kph). ...'If anybody found a piece of anything on the ground Monday morning, I would hope they wouldn't get too close to it,' [a NASA spokesman] said."
DRM

Doom9 Researchers Break BD+ 345

Posted by kdawson
from the blue-hooray dept.
An anonymous reader writes "BD+, the Blu-ray copy protection system that was supposed to last 10 years, has now been solidly broken by a group of doom9 researchers. Earlier, BD+ had been broken by the commercial company SlySoft." Someone from SlySoft posts a hint early in the thread, but then backs off for fear of getting fired. The break is announced on page 15.
Role Playing (Games)

Fallout 3 Launches Amidst Controversy 397

Posted by Soulskill
from the or-fallout-one-might-say dept.
Earlier this week, Bethesda released Fallout 3 after a long campaign of defending and protecting the game's reputation from claims that it contained inappropriate content. Ads for the game in Washington DC's subway system were pulled after they upset some touchy travelers over the depiction of post-apocalyptic Washington landmarks. Shortly before the game's release, early trailers were removed as well. Earlier this year, the game was banned in Australia for its in-game use of morphine, causing the drug's name to be changed to Med-X. On the issue of sensitive content, Bethesda's Emil Pagliarulo wrote in Edge Magazine about the design decision to disallow the killing of children in the game. Gamasutra ran an opinion piece on the same subject, and the Washington Post discusses the role of Washington DC in Fallout 3. On the DRM front, the game does come with SecuROM, but Bethesda says it's only used for a disc check. Reviews for the game have been overwhelmingly positive so far, despite reports of bugs with the save system and occasional lock-ups.

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