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Comment: Re:Minimum Competency to Get a Programming Job (Score 1) 466 466

That's probably due to the vast number of Java devs who have been doing it for many many years. Try Node.js, Rails, or Django; these are newer platforms where you won't have to compete with the same number-of-years-with-my-platform issue

+ - Ask Slashtot: Joining a Startup as an Older Programmer?

bdrasin writes: I've had a series of interviews with a late-term startup (approx. 300 employees) and I think there is a good chance they will make me an offer. The technology is great, my skills and interests are a good fit for the position, I think the company has a promising future, and I like they team. Frankly I'm damn excited about it, more so than for any job in my career.

However I'm worried about what could euphemistically be called "cultural" issues. I'm a few years over 40, with a wife and kids, and all of the engineers at the company seem to be at least 10 years younger than I am. Being at the company's office gives me a distinct old guy at the club feeling.

I don't think the overall number of hours the team works is more than I could handle, but the team does a lot of young-single-guy-at-a-startup group activities (rent-a-limo-and-go-clubbing night, weekends in Tahoe, burning man, in-office happy hour) that I wouldn't want or be able to participate in; I need to be home with my family for dinner most nights and weekends and so on.

I'm wondering if anyone else has had the experience of working at a startup with, or as, an older programmer, and how it worked out?

"Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come." --Matt Groening

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