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Comment Re:worth a read (Score 1) 380

So what's the solution? Certainly there will be smart companies that invest nearly everything they get back into themselves, like Google or perhaps Apple for example. These can help oust the less profitable, less useful companies (read: the ones wasting away their money on shareholders and corporate jets) back out of the market until the bigger ones wise up.

Maybe I'm just being idealistic.
United States

Submission + - $ China threatens 'nuclear option' - To crash the (

sloopo writes: "Described as China's "nuclear option" in the state media, such action could trigger a dollar crash at a time when the US currency is already breaking down through historic support levels. It would also cause a spike in US bond yields, hammering the US housing market and perhaps tipping the economy into recession. It is estimated that China holds over $900bn in a mix of US bonds. Read the full story, click here"
The Courts

Submission + - Washington Woman Sues RIAA for Attorneys Fees 1

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "A Washington woman sued by the RIAA has asked the Court to award her attorneys fees, after the record company plaintiffs (Interscope Records, Capitol Records, SONY BMG, Atlantic Recording, BMG Music, and Virgin Records) dropped their case against her after two (2) years of litigation, in Interscope v. Leadbetter. The brief submitted by her attorneys (pdf) pointed out the similarity between Ms. Leadbetter's case and Capitol v. Foster. In Leadbetter, as in Foster, the RIAA sued the woman solely because she had paid for an internet access account, and then later in the case attempted to plead "secondary liability" against her without any factual basis for doing so. This tactic had been repudiated by Judge Lee R. West in Capitol v. Foster as "marginal" and "untested" in his initial decision awarding attorneys fees, and in his later decision denying the RIAA's motion for reconsideration."

Never appeal to a man's "better nature." He may not have one. Invoking his self-interest gives you more leverage. -- Lazarus Long