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Submission + - US military finds F-35 software is a buggy mess (theregister.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) remains the problem child of the US military, with some operational tests abandoned in 2014, and buggy software proving a headache.

The US military's Office of the Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E) has released its latest annual report, and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter chapter describes the Department of Defense's efforts in trying to get the project back somewhere close to schedule.

To avoid a cascading series of delays that would have stretched into 2016, the project abandoned an Operational Utility Evaluation (OUE) planned in April 2014 for the Marines' Block 2B configuration of the aircraft.

How bad does a government procurement program have to get for it to get cancelled?

Submission + - Us viewing encrypted Israeli drones' feed (theintercept.com)

iceco2 writes: Us spying on allies is nothing new. It is surprising to see the ease with which encrypted israeli communication were intercepted. As always it wasn't the crypto which was broken just the lousy method it was applied with.

Submission + - Astronomers Generate Image Equivalent to Telescope 63,000 Miles Wide (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: The cosmos came into sharper focus this week with astronomers releasing the highest resolution astronomical image yet. The product of 15 earthbound radio telescopes and a Russian satellite, the image of a black hole in a galaxy 900 millions light years away is detailed enough to show the equivalent of a US 50-cent piece on the Moon.

Submission + - Hacktivist Dumps Controversial Data Belonging to America's Biggest Police Union (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An unknown hacker breached the computer systems of the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), the US' biggest police union, and dumped 2.5 GB of data online. The data was released via the Cthulhu website, and the site's owner, acting as an intermediary, says he still has around 18 TB of info he didn't release because it was too sensitive. FOP is one of America's biggest unions, with over 330,000 members.

Submission + - Anonymous Hacks And Takes Down 5,500 ISIS Accounts (theviralnewz.org)

An anonymous reader writes: We are all aware of the hacker group Anonymous calling out on ISIS after the horrific 13/11 Paris attacks. Anonymous is a group of hackers from all over the world. These are the people who can be anybody, right from the next door guy to your friend in abroad.

Just the people who have the courage to fight for justice. ISIS may have a lot of weapons, but these people have brains and heart to go against the wrong. Anonymous is also encouraging all the wannabe hackers to join the motion. It has released a hacking guide that includes: NoobGuide, Reporter, and Searcher.

ISIS seems to have called upon their doom and is going to witness it soon.

Submission + - That Israeli Grid Hack? Just more Ransomware. (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: Reports of a crippling cyber attack on the power grid in Israel (http://www.timesofisrael.com/steinitz-israels-electric-authority-hit-by-severe-cyber-attack/) appear to have been greatly exaggerated, as subsequent reports point to a simple ransomware outbreak on the office network of an industry regulator.

The reports of an attack on the Israeli follow a story in the Times of Israel (http://www.timesofisrael.com/steinitz-israels-electric-authority-hit-by-severe-cyber-attack/) quoting Israeli Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz at a Tel Aviv cyber security conference. It comes amidst a cold snap in the country that is causing power demands to spike, and just weeks after an apparent cyber attack on power substations in The Ukraine darkened some 80,000 households.

“This is a fresh example of the sensitivity of infrastructure to cyberattacks, and the importance of preparing ourselves in order to defend ourselves against such attacks,” Steinitz is quoted saying in the Times of Israel report.

But the events in Israel may be far more quotidian than Steinitz comments or the sensational headlines that follow would suggest. Rather than a crippling cyber attack on the country’s grid, the incident Steinitz referred to appears to be a ransomware outbreak on PCs and notebook computers used by staff at a government agency.

A report on Wednesday by the Israeli web site YNet News (http://www.yediot.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-4758366,00.html) describes what appears to be a typical ransomware malware infection within the offices of the Electricity Authority.

In a post on the web site of The SANS Institute (https://ics.sans.org/blog/2016/01/27/context-for-the-claim-of-a-cyber-attack-on-the-israeli-electric-grid), Robert M. Lee said the incident underscores the inherent danger in reporting on cyber attacks, which take many different forms and have many different motivations.

“This once again stresses the importance around individuals and media carefully evaluating statements regarding cyber attacks and infrastructure as they can carry significant weight.”

Submission + - The Danger Of Terror Attacks Using Drones, And Possible Countermeasures

An anonymous reader writes: You can add terrorist-controlled drones to the list of dangers we need to be scared about in the future, the Oxford Research Group announced after publishing the latest report by Remote Control, a project of the Network for Social Change. The report contains information about over 200 current and upcoming unmanned aerial, ground and marine systems, and evaluates their capabilities for delivering payloads (e.g. explosive devices), imaging capabilities (e.g. for reconnaissance purposes), and their general capabilities. Even though the report notes that commercial drones have a limited flight time, range of movement, and payload capacity, and that their operators still have to be relatively close to a potential target, the researchers are particularly worried about the possibility of drones being used as remotely controlled explosive devices.

Submission + - Black Hat SEO Campaign Powered By SQL Injection

itwbennett writes: A new threat advisory from Akamai warns of a Black Hat SEO campaign that's leveraging SQL Injection as a means to generate links to a website dedicated to stories about cheating. At one point, Akamai says, the campaign included more than 3,800 websites and 348 unique IP addresses. CSO Online's Steve Ragan points out that 'technically, the campaign is more mass defacement than straight-up SEO scam, because the primary focus was SQL Injection.' And, while the Akamai report doesn't list the website behind the campaign, Ragan did some digging and found that storyofcheating[dot]com is the site that got the most traffic from the campaign.

Submission + - Nobel laureate lambasts homeopathy and astrology as 'bogus' fields (dispatchtribunal.com)

hypnosec writes: In a blow to Indian cultural and traditional ways, Nobel laureate Venkatraman Ramakrishnan has lambasted homeopathy and astrology as bogus fields. Ramakrishnan, while speaking at the Panjab University at Chandigarh to deliver the Har Gobind Khorana lecture on ‘On Nobody’s Word: Evidence and Modern Science’, said that the two practices are not only useless but harmful as well and India should adhere to its constitution which calls for promotion of scientific temper appealing that India needs to cultivate a more rational outlook of such age old practices.

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