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Earth

+ - Six of Hanford's Nuclear Waste Tanks Badly Leaking ->

SchrodingerZ writes: "Recent review of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state (where the bulk of Cold War nuclear material was created) has found that six of its underground storage tanks are badly leaking. Estimations say each tank is leaking 'anywhere from a few gallons to a few hundred gallons of radioactive material a year'. Washington's governor, Jay Inslee said in a statement on Friday that 'Energy officials recently figured out they had been inaccurately measuring the 56 million gallons of waste in Hanford’s tanks.' The Hanford cleanup project has been one of the most expensive American projects for nuclear cleanup. Plans are in place to create a treatment plant to turn the hazardous material into less hazardous glass (proposed to cost $13.4 billion), but for now officials are trying just to stop the leaking from the corroded tanks. Today the leaks do not have an immediate threat on the environment, but 'there is [only] 150 to 200 feet of dry soil between the tanks and the groundwater', and are just five miles from the Colombia River."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Virtualization, Anyone? (Score 1) 205 205

And deploy it on what? The assumption here is the hardware can't handle the load. Deploying a new VM on the same hardware isn't going to make it faster.. quite the opposite. Virtualization doesn't solve all problems, especially when it's probably running on underpowered hardware.

Remember above when I said "Deploy another host?" That hardware.

+ - Where to point a friend to learn HTML/CSS/JS->

arhhook writes: "A friend is asking a friend (true story) about private 'lessons' for learning HTML/CSS/JavaScript (jQuery in specific). The knowledgeable friend doesn't have the specific time to sit down in blocks to help teach, and isn't within physical proximity to make things easier. Phone/Internet work for these things, but again require dedicated blocks of time. Does anyone know of any tutorials, or methods that have worked nicely? I am aware w3schools exist, are there any other decent resources to point out as well?"
Link to Original Source
Android

+ - Nokia CEO says company is on a "burning platform"->

An anonymous reader writes: There’s no denying that Nokia is in turmoil. Over the past few months, the Finnish handset maker has laid off hundreds of employees as the company continues to lose significant market share to the likes of Apple and Google's Android. In a recently leaked memo, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop doesn’t mince words as he calls Nokia’s current OS strategy a “burning platform” with a plummeting market share. Elop’s critique of Nokia’s current predicament is brutally frank and honest, with particular attention devoted to how companies like Apple and Google completely redefined the smartphone market, subsequently leaving Nokia’s own efforts years behind.
Link to Original Source
Music

Music Really Is Intoxicating, After All 174 174

jamie writes "Our reaction to the music that we love stimulates the flow of dopamine into certain sections of the brain, concludes a new study out of McGill University. The findings 'help to explain why music is of such high value across all human societies,' the scientists note."
Image

German Kindergartens Ordered To Pay Copyright For Songs 291 291

BBird writes "Deutsche Welle reports: 'Up until this year, preschools could teach and produce any kind of song they wanted. But now they have to pay for a license if they want children to sing certain songs. A tightening of copyright rules means kindergartens now have to pay fees to Germany's music licensing agency, GEMA, to use songs that they reproduce and perform. The organization has begun notifying creches and other daycare facilities that if they reproduce music to be sung or performed, they must pay for a license.'"
Image

Stunts, Idiocy, and Hero Hacks 208 208

snydeq writes "InfoWorld's Paul Venezia serves up six real-world tales of IT stunts and solutions that required a touch of inspired insanity to pull off, proving once again that knowing when to throw out the manual and do something borderline irresponsible is essential to day-to-day IT work. 'It could be server on the brink of shutting down all operations, a hard drive that won't power up vital data, or a disgruntled ex-employee who's hidden vital system passwords on the network. Just when all seems lost, it's time to get creative and don your IT daredevil cap, then fire up the oven, shove the end of a pencil into the motherboard, or route the whole city network through your laptop to get the job done,' Venezia writes."

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