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Comment: Re:Yay Canada! (Score 2) 231

by anarcobra (#49011133) Attached to: Canadian Supreme Court Rules Ban On Assisted Suicide Unconstitutional
Maybe you can do it like they do in Switzerland (at least I think it was there).
Someone asks you three times if you are sure you want to off yourself (after you have signed the paperwork and everything), and they hand you a cup of poison.
You have to drink it yourself.
If you are too senile or weak to drink it yourself, tough luck.

Comment: Re:I don't know enough about this stuff (Score 2) 63

by anarcobra (#48957871) Attached to: MIT Randomizes Tasks To Speed Massive Multicore Processors
What you say is pretty much correct.
The reason out of order execution is faster, is because in most cases the compiler doesn't know the full pipeline delay of each instruction.
This helps with making binaries compatible with different processors implementing the same instruction set.
For instance, the compiler might assume that +, -, *, and / all take the same amount of cycles to calculate, when in reality of course some of those will be faster than others.

A calculation like A = B*C; B = A+D; C= C+1 could then be reordered to A=B*C C=C+1 B=A+D. (assuming that multiplication takes longer than addition.)
In this case the B=A+D calculation waits for the A=B*C calculation, but the C=C+1 calculation doesn't have to wait.
If the compiler was fully aware of pipeline delays of each instruction, then it could have scheduled the instructions like that in the first place.
But then you code would only run optimally on processors with those exact pipeline delays. It also makes scheduling more complicated.

Comment: Re:The Pirate Bay (Score 2) 302

by anarcobra (#48605731) Attached to: The Pirate Bay Responds To Raid
So?
Why should anyone have almost perpetual* control over something he thought up one day?
14 years is more than enough to make money off the movie, and after that there is nothing stopping you from making more movies about it.
Get a trademark for the "Star Wars" name if you don't want others using it. Also, Disney doesn't get to "take" anything.
Sure they could make a remake or whatever after 14 years, but then again, so could the original creator.

* I know that 70 years after death isn't perpetual, but it might as well be since everyone who was alive when that IP was released will be dead when it comes out of copyright.

Comment: Re:Yes!!! Please don't pay me overtime!!!! (Score 1) 545

by anarcobra (#48538207) Attached to: Should IT Professionals Be Exempt From Overtime Regulations?
The point of overtime pay isn't to get payed more.
It's to encourage your employer to hire more people rather than overwork you.
The fact that you misunderstood this and used overtime to get more pay doesn't mean that overtime is bad.
Without overtime your employer will just make you work more without paying you more.
And I'm sure if you don't want overtime pay you can negotiate with your employe about it.

Q: How many IBM CPU's does it take to execute a job? A: Four; three to hold it down, and one to rip its head off.

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