Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: WRONG! (Score 1) 555

by alexfeig (#30035954) Attached to: Verizon Droid Tethering Comes At a Hefty Price
You do not need the $45/mo plan for ActiveSync/Exchange support. They will tell you to do, but from *personal* experience, this is BS. Browse the droid forums, plenty of people will tell you the same thing. Verizon is just like every other cell company - they will squeeze where they can (But I think mostly it has to do with inadequate training).

To be honest, I don't even see how they could block it... it's just an SSL connection...

Comment: San Francisco... (Score 1) 158

by alexfeig (#30008384) Attached to: AT&T's City-By-City Plan To Up Wireless Coverage
Wow, if this is true "AT&T is in the midst of leveraging its prime 850MHz radio spectrum for 3G in San Francisco, a step that is 90 percent complete, Donovan said." then they have a long way to go.

I just actually canceled my AT&T service after a few years of having absolutely godawful service in downtown SF, and I can tell you that from my perspective NO improvement has been made PERIOD.

This is the biggest load of BS I've read in a long time. They have no clue on how to fix this, and people in my office (including myself) have been able to cancel contracts without an early termination fee because they KNOW their service sucks.

Comment: Got this email from their CEO (Tim) (Score 5, Informative) 270

by alexfeig (#28631831) Attached to: Experimental Fees Settle Royalty War For Internet Radio
I've been listening to pandora since it came out - I'm a huge fan. I got this email yesterday... pretty interesting. Apparently I like their free service *too* much:

I hope this email finds you enjoying a great summer Pandora soundtrack.

I'm writing with some important news. Please forgive the lengthy email; it requires some explaining.

First, I want to let you know that we've reached a resolution to the calamitous Internet radio royalty ruling of 2007. After more than two precarious years, we are finally on safe ground with a long-term agreement for survivable royalty rates â" thanks to the extraordinary efforts of our listeners who voiced an absolute avalanche of support for us on Capitol Hill. We are deeply thankful.

While we did the best we could to lower the rates, we are going to have to make an adjustment that will affect about 10% of our users who are our heaviest listeners. Specifically, we are going to begin limiting listening to 40 hours per month on the web. Because we have to pay royalty fees per song and per listener, it makes very heavy listeners hard to support on advertising alone. Most listeners will never hit this cap, but it seems that you might.

We hate the idea of capping anyone's usage, so we've been working to devise an alternative for listeners like you. We've come up with two solutions and we hope that one of them will work for you:

Your first option is to continue listening just as you have been and, if and when you reach the 40 hour limit in a given month, to pay just $0.99 for unlimited listening for the rest of that month. This isn't a subscription. You can pay by credit card and your card will be charged for just that one month. You'll be able to keep listening as much as you'd like for the remainder of the month. We hope this is relatively painless and affordable - the same price as a single song download.



Your second option is to upgrade to our premium version called Pandora One. Pandora One costs $36 per year. In addition to unlimited monthly listening and no advertising, Pandora One offers very high quality 192 Kbps streams, an elegant desktop application that eliminates the need for a browser, personalized skins for the Pandora player, and a number of other features: http://www.pandora.com/pandora_one.

If neither of these options works for you, I hope you'll keep listening to the free version - 40 hours each month will go a long way, especially if you're really careful about hitting pause when youâ(TM)re not listening. Weâ(TM)ll be sure to let you know if you start getting close to the limit, and weâ(TM)ve created a counter you can access to see how many hours youâ(TM)ve already used each month.

Weâ(TM)ll be implementing this change starting this month (July), Iâ(TM)d welcome your feedback and suggestions. The combination of our usage patterns and the "per song per listener" royalty cost creates a financial reality that we can't ignore...but we very much want you to continue listening for years to come.

Comment: Potentially misleading... (Score 1) 515

by alexfeig (#26475343) Attached to: Ubuntu Download Speeds Beat Windows XP's
I don't have TW cable, but I do have Comcast. Comcast will allow you to do what's called "PowerBoost" - which I'm sure most of you have heard of.

Essentially what it does is allow you to burst up to twice your bandwidth for a certain amount of seconds (really nice for smallish files).

PowerBoost, at least for me, seems pretty intelligent to network congestion. If it's prime time, I notice it doesn't do it as much. I believe that's what's happening here.

Besides that, no one but Time Warner has control over the network. You have no idea what's going on with it. For all anyone knows, there was fiber cut at the exact same moment...

Try this with a local server and a switch and then let us know how it is.

PS. What's a kilo bit? Is that 1000 grams worth of bits?

Comment: Maybe a little late here, but... (Score 3, Informative) 480

by alexfeig (#25571703) Attached to: Resisting the PGP Whole Disk Encryption Craze
I run the IT Department for a company in the EDU industry.

We have about 80 laptops in the field, and about 2x that in desktops.

Since we deal with a lot of sensitive data (read: personally identifiable) I have been deploying PGP WDE for the past few months to all laptops (no desktops).

Speed:
Our users primarily use a web browser and Outlook. No one has complained about speed yet. Caveat: While it's encrypting, the laptops will slow to a crawl until it's done. We've had a lot of complaints, even after my helpdesk guys advise them.

Administration:
Couldn't be easier. Someone mentioned that you could essentially "lose the key." Not possible, and I've tested it. WDE creates a backup 1 time use token so that if someone forgets their password you're not up a creek. Also, the server side software allows for backups, so you're covered on that end.

Cost/etc:
Expensive as hell, in my opinion, but a hell of a lot cheaper than having to pay our lawyers. My impression is a very positive one. The only thing that leaves much to be desired is support. You have to submit a ticket online, and if you're lucky, you'll get a call back within the day.

The one day you'd sell your soul for something, souls are a glut.

Working...