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Comment: Re:Well I think this is useful. (Score 1) 199

by agm (#49489729) Attached to: Chrome 42 Launches With Push Notifications

Doesn't look cross platform to me. For example: it appears as if there is no Linux support. The iOS support is a native app which put you at the whim of the Apple approval process. I don't consider that to be cross platform. Web apps aren't subject to that process.

There is no market for linux applications - the key word being "Market". You can't make a living selling your software, unlike BSD, OSX, Windows, iOS, and the Android runtime.

Thanks for telling me what the market for my particular kind of app is.

Also, your claim that "it's subject to Apple's whims" is so bogus it's not a joke. This applies to ANY product being developed for iOS

Not for those apps developed using browser technology. Unless you can point me to evidence that shows Apple vetting what website you can and cannot view.

- your claim was that there were no cross-platform tools, which you are now trying to back up with lies by not just moving the goalposts, but by using made-up definitions that nobody else recognizes. It's really insulting.

The most cross platform platform is the browser. You pointed to a framework that does not run on Linux (which is a viable market for certain kinds of apps) and is not cross platform on iOS (without forcing you to go through their review process which many legitimate types of apps would not pass).

Comment: Re:So what is the answer? (Score 1) 106

by agm (#49483049) Attached to: In New Zealand, a Legal Battle Looms Over Streaming TV

Yes, data are data, but I don't see how a law making it illegal for you to obtain content that has been geo-blocked would break the Internet.

The internet has no geography. There is no way the technology of the internet can tell where a person is physically located. IP addresses sure can't do that.

The issue in this case is people lying to Netflix about their physical address. That's more of a contractural civil issue, not a criminal one.

Comment: Re:Well I think this is useful. (Score 1) 199

by agm (#49483041) Attached to: Chrome 42 Launches With Push Notifications

There are plenty of ways to get cross-platform w/o using a web browser. Embarcadero

Doesn't look cross platform to me. For example: it appears as if there is no Linux support. The iOS support is a native app which put you at the whim of the Apple approval process. I don't consider that to be cross platform. Web apps aren't subject to that process.

or for 2d/3d games, etc, there's Unity, which also supports iOS and Android, PS3/4, XBox360/One, Blackberry, Windows, Linux, Apple, etc.

There are 2 reason to continue to use a browse: one is "because that's what we've been doing so far," the other is "we don't want to learn how to write real code". The "we target it because everyone has a browser" argument is bogus - browsers have been used to download and install programs for ages.

Your first objection isn't always the case. I am aware of development teams who have never developed for the web before and are now starting to because it's a viable platform for rich applications.

As for writing "real code"? How condescending and patently untrue. Downloading an application is not the same thing as developing once and running on multiple platforms.

Comment: Re:Well I think this is useful. (Score 1) 199

by agm (#49481577) Attached to: Chrome 42 Launches With Push Notifications

Your definition of "good enough" is defective, given the ongoing history of security flaws and bloat.

That's why I said "good enough" and not "perfect". Security flaws aren't limited to web browsers, though because of the nature of them serving data from other computers it's a natural vector. Bloat is fixed with more hardware :-)

Comment: Re:So what is the answer? (Score 1) 106

by agm (#49481555) Attached to: In New Zealand, a Legal Battle Looms Over Streaming TV

You seem to have inferred that I live in the US, I don't. Data is data, and the routing on the internet is designed to be flexible - the data can be routed through any servers. Legislating against this is to break the way the internet works.

The issue is that content providers are sending data to people when they ask for it. That makes this he content provideds fault - they should stop sending data to people they are not allowed to.

Comment: Re:Chromium (Score 1) 199

by agm (#49476473) Attached to: Chrome 42 Launches With Push Notifications

For many categories of apps this isn't a possibility. You want an app that works on both a desktop with 3 large monitors and on a phone. They are two incongruent device types. You won't convince the former that what they really need is a little phone to run your app.

(Perhaps you were being sarcastic, I couldn't tell).

Comment: Re:Just make geoblocking illegal (Score 2) 106

by agm (#49474231) Attached to: In New Zealand, a Legal Battle Looms Over Streaming TV

Geoblocking is fine if they insist on doing this. It's their content, they set the rules. But they shouldn't be silly enough to assume that your IP address somehow betrays your location. It doesn't. It can't. The IP system is not designed to indicate geographical location.

The reason this "problem" exists is because a company in NZ (as an example) can by exclusive rights to a particular programme (such as GoT). They have paid rights for this exclusive licence. They get a bit pissy if people can acquire this content without using their services. Such a thing should run foul of anti-competitive laws. A better model would be for service providers (such as SkyTV) to charge for access to the individual programmes, not for entire channels. This would work much better in a streaming world than a broadcast one. Having said that, SkyTV in NZ does often have pop-up channels for particular series.

Comment: Re:So what is the answer? (Score 3, Insightful) 106

by agm (#49474163) Attached to: In New Zealand, a Legal Battle Looms Over Streaming TV

If they want to use some form of geoblocking they should not rely on IP address as that's not a sensible nor foolproof way to tell when an internet end-point is physically located.

VPNs are perfectly legal. Proxy servers are legal. Using a different DNS server is legal. These things cannot be outlawed.

If services don't want to stream content to people in NZ, why do they continue to do so? It's up to them to not do this. They complaining that they are streaming us content - then stop! It's up to them to stop doing that.

Comment: Re:"Free" exercise (Score 4, Interesting) 304

by agm (#49123255) Attached to: I ride a bike ...

I'm in Tauranga and have started cycling to work every day it's not raining. It's 20km to work and back, but that's all on the flat so it's easy going. The goal is 100km+ a week. I've learned that if you want your weekend days to last, go for a 15km ride first thing in the morning. By the time 2pm comes around it feels like it's 5.

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