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Comment: Re:Publish the code (Score 1) 107

by Yaur (#47083797) Attached to: DARPA Unveils Hack-Resistant Drone
What, besides a OTP is "mathematically proven" to be secure? Probably that is what they are using, though hopefully with a hardware entropy source and some physical connection required to replace the key data. Biggest issue here would be getting the grunts in the field to actually replace the key unless doing so is required to get it to launch. OTOH "mathematically proven" could just be technobable that means "built on problems that are assumed to be hard."

Comment: Re:That is why social Hacking is Bad MmmKaa. (Score 1) 329

by Yaur (#46843333) Attached to: Anonymous's Latest Target: Boston Children's Hospital
I pay 9$ a month for hosting of my projects server through webfaction which is substantially less than any connection I could get that included a static IP. There is really no excuse except ignorance for hosting your website "under your desk" except ignorance. Obviously there are issues with shared hosting for places like hospitals, but once you have to deal with stuff like HIPPA there is even less excuse for under the desk hosting.

Comment: Re:...er... (Score 1) 236

by Yaur (#46811981) Attached to: Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found
Sure, if your technically competent enough to put OpenWRT on your router go for it but there is some advantage for "grandma" to be able to upgrade her firmware. I have no inside knowledge here but the AC basically asked if there is a potential legitimate use here and in fat there is... whether they are using it for good or evil I doubt anyone here can say.

Comment: Re:The commits are funny into themselves. (Score 1) 379

by Yaur (#46803785) Attached to: OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

Comparing to zero is faster in most architectures and still is a valid optimization. There shouldn't be any problems with cache misses either, if the architecture does stream detection it should do it for reversed streams too and if it doesn't (only detecting actual misses) doing it in reverse isn't a problem.

A good compiler should take care of that optimization for you (VC11 certainly does).

Comment: Re:how many of these people don't want to retire? (Score 4, Insightful) 341

by Yaur (#46777011) Attached to: I expect to retire ...
I can't imagine that there will be a time in my life where I'm going to want to stop building stuff. I might "retire" and work on my own stuff or FOSS or something, but can't imagine that I would retire as in not work on something constructive. My dad is in his 60s and is the same way so I'm expecting that attitude isn't going to change.

Comment: Re:Go after em Nate (Score 2) 335

by Yaur (#46539599) Attached to: Nate Silver's New Site Stirs Climate Controversy
But he does talk about exactly that. Specifically about the relationship between per capita GDP and the expected death toll from natural disasters. How do you account for that if the reason isn't better, or at least more widely available, technology and preparedness. Is the counter argument that we are getting better at preventing damage from disasters faster than they are getting worse? That doesn't seem particularly different than his POV.

Comment: Re:Read the update at the end of the article (Score 1) 335

by Yaur (#46539499) Attached to: Nate Silver's New Site Stirs Climate Controversy
If anything I thought it was part of his argument... cost in absolute terms is going up because GDP is going up, but going down as a share of GDP because wealth also allows us to prepare better for disasters (e.g. with better technology). I'm not in a position to say, but assuming that he hasn't doctored the data (which seems sadly common in this domain) it seems like an interesting assessment.

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