Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Related Questions (Score 1) 608

by XSforMe (#31189246) Attached to: Suggestions For a Coax-To-Ethernet Solution?

> the expensive part is probably paying someone to put the cable

Pulling cable can be tricky, specially if you don't have a guide to do the job, but since the old coaxes are already there, why not use them as guides? Of course this shouldn't be attempted by a humanities major, but this is Slashdot.

Comment: Re:Does this open the floodgates? (Score 1) 164

by XSforMe (#30922092) Attached to: PlayStation 3 Hack Released Online

I recognize my case might be fairly unique, but I was looking for an affordable DVP for my living room, and XBMC filled in the description nicely. The second day after I got my XBox I chipped it and loaded XBMC into it. Ironically enough, out of the 30 games I ended up buying for the XBox only two were pirates (and one of them sucked, so I basically threw it to the garbage can three days after I got it).

Had it not been for the XBox hackability and the development of XBMC, I would have never bought the box (which is nothing more than a PC, and an obsolete one at the time I got it).

Media (Apple)

Apple's "iPad" Out In the Open 1713

Posted by timothy
from the will-care-when-it-runs-linux dept.
Reader oxide7 is one of the many to note that the heaviest speculation is mostly over (still waiting on the price, though) about Apple's anticipated new device (though there are surely plenty of questions about the device's hardware capabilities and the scope of its software and content marketplace): "At an event in San Francisco Apple released its anticipated iPad.'[It's] Way better than a laptop, way better then a phone. You can turn it any way you want. To see the whole page is phenomenal,' said Jobs." The (0.5") skinny: 1.5 lbs, multitouch, up to 64GB of flash, 9.7" screen, and a 1Ghz "Apple A4" chip (more about the A4 in Engadget's developing story). The iPad is closer in concept to an expanded iPhone (OS and all) than a miniaturized laptop, though it doesn't have quite as much connectivity as you might expect, with no 3G connection built in. (You'll have to make do with 802.11n, Bluetooth, and tethering.) Live coverage is ongoing at gdgt live, Engadget, and Gizmodo, as well as various others. Update by timothy, 19:58 GMT: Got the 3G part wrong; 3G is indeed an option. Prices run from $499 (16GB flash, WiFi but no 3G) to $829 (WiFi and 3G, 64GB flash). Should start shipping in 60 days (WiFi only), in 90 days for 3G. Surprsingly, no built-in camera.
Power

Heat Engines Shrunk By Seven Orders of Magnitude 168

Posted by kdawson
from the gimme-a-v8-of-those dept.
KentuckyFC writes "The vast majority of motors that power our planes, trains, and automobiles are heat engines. They rely on the rapid expansion of gas as it heats up to generate movement. But attempts to shrink them by any significant amount have mostly ended in failure. Today, the smallest heat engines have a volume of some 10^7 cubic micrometers. Now group of Dutch engineers has built a heat engine that is seven orders of magnitude smaller than this. The engine consists of a piezoelectric bar that expands and contracts in the normal piezoelectric way. However it also heats up and cools at the same time causing a thermal expansion and contraction, which lags the piezoelectric displacement. By carefully choosing the frequency of the driving AC current, the Dutch team found a resonant effect in which the thermal expansion and contraction amplifies the mechanical motion, making it a true heat engine. Operating the thermodynamic cycle in reverse turns the device into a heat pump or refrigerator. The total volume of the device is just 0.5 cubic micrometres."
Botnet

Man Challenges 250,000 Strong Botnet and Succeeds 206

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-fought-the-law-and-the-law-one dept.
nandemoari writes "When security officials decide to 'go after' computer malware, most conduct their actions from a defensive standpoint. For most of us, finding a way to rid a computer of the malware suffices — but for one computer researcher, however, the change from a defensive to an offensive mentality is what ended the two year chase of a sinister botnet once and for all. For two years, Atif Mushtaq had been keeping the notorious Mega-D bot malware from infecting computer networks. As of this past November, he suddenly switched from defense to offense. Mega-D had forced more than 250,000 PCs to do its bidding via botnet control."

Comment: Worldwide practice (Score 5, Informative) 280

by XSforMe (#30359386) Attached to: CRIA Faces $60 Billion Lawsuit

The big labels have been pulling this stunt world wide during years. Recently in Mexico, Police raided the major offices of Sony after it decided to tell Alejandro Fernandez (a Mexican folk country singer) they were going to publish some of his tunes with or without his permission. After the smoke had settled, the Police seiged over 6K pirated CDs from the same offices of those who can't keep their mouth shut when it comes to bashing pirates.

Games

Cops Play Wii During Undercover Drug Raid 251

Posted by samzenpus
from the a-250-average-doesn't-just-happen dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Guns drawn, cops busted down the door of a suspected south Florida drug dealer, then proceeded to kick some ass on Wii bowling. A security cam captured some playing video games while others searched for drugs and weapons. Clearly they just misunderstood when they were told to search the house for Weed."
The Courts

+ - Warner found guilty of piracy

Submitted by
XSforMe
XSforMe writes "After a six year long legal battle Warner Music was found guilty of plagiarism and piracy, according to a judge in Mexico. The disputed property lies in the rights of a song included in a music album produced by a popular mexican interpreter which sold over 3 million copies. The judge has ordered Warner to pay Mr. Lifshitz (claimant in the trail) 40% of the net income of said album. Warner has 15 days to either pony up the money or take the case to a higher court."

My computer can beat up your computer. - Karl Lehenbauer

Working...