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Comment: Re:This is clearly a hoax (Score 1) 989

by Wardish (#33035406) Attached to: Louisiana, Intelligent Design, and Science Classes

Here's the really fun part.

Once upon a time there was a culture that was the technological wonder of the world. They invented many things including modern mathematics and many other wonders.

Then their theology started exerting more and more control until free thinking and invention was not only subservient to religion but in many cases was banned.

The religion, fundamentalist Islam, and the civilization, Arab.

And now our own brand of Christian fundamentalism is forcing us down that same road. Give it a couple of generations and we will be ohhh and ahhhing at the magic of magnetism, or electricity.

Fundamentalist Islam destroyed the Arab civilization and fundamentalist Christians will do so for us.

Comment: Cyclic uplift (Score 1) 378

by Wardish (#32486824) Attached to: Where Will Your Next Gadget Be Made?

Made in Japan
Made in Korea
Made in Chine (perhaps a special case)

It's a cycle that 3rd world countries should celebrate.

1. Manufacturing, starting with minimal tech, moves to country with extremely cheap labor but is relatively stable.
2. Tech steadily improves as higher and higher tech move in to take advantage of labor costs.
3. Eventually the labor costs start to rise as the country joins the list of developed countries.
4. Rinse and repeat.

Assuming civilization doesn't seriously back step this process will be a great thing for the world.

Now for the pie in the sky, this process will move off world eventually. Earth orbit, moon, asteroids...

Comment: Principle / school punishment (Score 1) 319

by Wardish (#32464852) Attached to: PA Appeals Court Weighs Punishment For Students' Online Parodies

What if the child had done the same thing to someone on the city zoning board? Would that mean he could use his power and influence to punish the child? Ridiculous I know but rezone the child's home. Would that be proper punishment?

What if the child had used a picture of a principal from somewhere else for the fake Alabama principal? Would her principal be entitled to punish her?

The problem of course is that what is published on the net by "children" (or for that matter many "adults") does not come with an attribute for accuracy and many people don't have the sense to assign one for uncorroborated info from the net. That plus we assume guilt from little or no facts.

Comment: Re:Wait, does this mean... (Score 1) 389

by Wardish (#32314406) Attached to: Quantum Teleportation Achieved Over 16 km In China

I'm happy with standard speed of light speed, or lower for that matter.

The "does this mean..." I'm curious about is for undetectable transmission of information. Commonly referred to as "Bugging".

Does this enable the installation of some type of mechanism that will enable information to be transmitted without detection by any known means.

If so the world just got much more interesting. Of course such would be the pervue of the 3 letter brigades for some time, but it gets even more entertaining (pun intended) when such technology becomes available to an average individual.

Welcome to information really is now free.

Comment: Analagy and I recommend (Score 1) 118

by Wardish (#31726772) Attached to: Landmark Canadian Hyperlink Case Goes To Supreme Court

Hi Tom. I'm looking for a book, "Catcher in the Rye".
Hey Ralph. That's amazing, I was looking for that just last week. I made a list of where you can get it.

1. Library on 6th street. Serious restrictions on use, must return, no notes in margins.
2. Bookstore on East Main. Good place but a bit pricey. On the plus side you will have a copy with full control on how YOU use it.
3. Used bookstore on 8th and Wine. Great prices but it's a nasty neighborhood. Lot of crime recorded in the area. One might even say that area's primary purpose is criminal.

Anyway, here's the list. Hollar at me later and if I have any updates I'll let you know.

I would recommend doing a bit of research on what web resources the members of the supreme court use. Then you can provide examples of what such would be if this mess isn't corrected.

Comment: Not just contract stupid (Score 2, Insightful) 200

by Wardish (#31298564) Attached to: The Difficulty of Dismantling Constellation

The fact that Nasa is contract stupid (I'm guessing deals to placate various legislators, but hey, I'm paranoid.) is only part of the problem.

Nasa lives and dies over gee wizz flashy programs to get funding. Nasa has to impress the powers that be, President, advisors, legislators, defense contractors, and even lobbyists, to get decent upper management and funding. They have to be even more impressive to maintain the needed funding over multiple years and administrations.

Because...

Most ventures having to do with space require a lot of time as well as consistent funding. Congress, who holds the purse strings, is motivated by short term goals and is easily swayed by other vested interests (see above).

The only way I can see to fix this would require a law or constitutional amendment, if necessary, to enable congress to assign budgetary funds, ideally multi-year, that are paid in advance and very difficult to change. At least a 2/3 or even a 3/4 vote should be necessary to remove or repeal. This sort of protection will have to include the top management at Nasa as well.

Not a lot else you can do unless you can make all three branches of government reasonable, honorable, and able to think and plan on a long range basis.

Comment: Fiscal Reality (Score 1) 319

by Wardish (#31279322) Attached to: Senators Blast NASA For Lacking Vision

Unfortunately the morally repugnant legislators are correct as far as it goes. Nasa indeed needs gee wizz flashy programs to achieve funding as this article shows. Nasa has to impress the powers that be, President, advisors, legislators, defense contractors, and even lobbyists, to get decent upper management and funding. They have to be even more impressive to maintain the needed funding over multiple years and administrations.

Because...

Most ventures having to do with space require a lot of time as well as consistent funding. Congress, who holds the purse strings, is motivated by short term goals and is easily swayed by other vested interests (see above).

The only way I can see to fix this would require a law or constitutional amendment, if necessary, to enable congress to assign budgetary funds, ideally multi-year, that are paid in advance and very difficult to change. At least a 2/3 or even a 3/4 vote should be necessary to remove or repeal. This sort of protection will have to include the top management at Nasa as well.

Not a lot else you can do unless you can make all three branches of government reasonable, honorable, and able to think and plan on a long range basis.

Comment: Re:Peer Review / publication process (Score 1) 505

by Wardish (#31078120) Attached to: Call For Scientific Research Code To Be Released

I agree, however if you make it a requirement to publish, I believe that the necessity of publishing will quickly outweigh the "need" for proprietary code.

Simulations can be the key to turning data into something understandable. Especially for those who can't see patterns in datasets. Not absolutely required but reproducing someone's simulation... There are so many ways to massage a large complicated dataset.
 

Comment: Re:Peer Review / publication process (Score 1) 505

by Wardish (#31077918) Attached to: Call For Scientific Research Code To Be Released

Being as I have reviewed many things over the years, including software.

Getting a different answer only tells you it's different. Could be your code.

Reviewing his code can not only show a problem(s) but can let you know if it's significant. As stated before, most but not all coding errors are not relevent to the final conclusions.

Last but not least, if you are going to complain about my work, it might be helpful to offer some useful information. I got different results isn't useless, but it's in the neighborhood.

CDA

+ - Terrorism - Government - Media

Submitted by Wardish
Wardish (699865) writes "Terrorism is using violence to instill fear with the desire of changing the victim's or victim's countries policy, way of life, etc.

What Terrorists NEED is publicity and fear. Deny them that and they have almost no power. In other words, no sensationalism by media or the government.

You could argue that our government and the media are deliberately aiding and comforting Terrorists and Terrorism. I don't believe the goal of either is to help our enemies but there is no doubt it is the result. The terrorists are getting all the fear, publicity, and degeneration of our rights they could dream of. The publicity, emphasis, and outright fear mongering for personal and organizational profit is the goal, but the results are absolutely the best the terrorists could have wished for.

I'm going to avoid any conspiracy theories, they aren't needed to account for what has and is happening.

Media is easy, fear and sensationalism drives up ratings. Once upon a time our news was about accurate news, today it's about how to present and spin the news in as sensationalistic a manner as possible. How often have you heard "news" stories that appear to be next but are delayed while you listen to others and of course a round or two of commercials or "Tune in at 11pm, and get all the details." Honor and integrity have for the most part been replaced with glitz and profit.

Governments, all governments, want things to go smoothly. The less power citizens have the simpler things go. Demanding citizens are inconvenient and resource intensive. But you can't just remove all of a citizens rights at once. Too intrusive might wake up the population. However, when the population is frightened it's much easier to remove or limit citizens rights especially with a series of "minor" changes, for the children, for your security, to catch the terrorists, and quietly because you can't be responsible for your own life...

I don't know where on the slippery slope we are, but I do know we are not at the top."

To write good code is a worthy challenge, and a source of civilized delight. -- stolen and paraphrased from William Safire

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