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Comment: Re:x/0 does not equal 0. (Score 1) 1064 1064

by Verdatum (#49941571) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's the Harm In a Default Setting For Div By Zero?
Hmm, I've got Khan Academy agreeing with me too: https://www.khanacademy.org/ma... on his board at 3:16. But, what does he know, he's only one of the most highly regarded sources for learning mathematics online...I'm sure it was just a slip-up that no one seems to have successfully countered in his comments...

Comment: Re:Infinity (Score 2) 1064 1064

by Verdatum (#49939867) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's the Harm In a Default Setting For Div By Zero?
it approaches infinity if you start at one and get closer and closer and closer to 0. N/.00000001 is pretty high.

But it approaches negative infinity if you start at -1 and get closer and closer and closer to 0. N/-.00000000001 is pretty low.

because of this discontinuity...the largest discontinuity possible in fact, the actual value of N/0 cannot be any of these compromises. It has to not exist.

Comment: Video explaination (Score 1) 1064 1064

by Verdatum (#49939811) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's the Harm In a Default Setting For Div By Zero?
This video does a decent job of explaining the problem: Numberphile: The problem with zero" It tries to address the very question that OP is asking.

Division by zero isn't equal to zero. It isn't equal to positive infinity. It isn't equal to negative infinity. the value of any number divided by zero (including 0) is that it does not exist. After all, doesn't any number divided by itself equal to one? So shouldn't 0/0 = 1? No, because you can't divide by zero. The proper way for a computer to respond to an attempt to divide by zero is, "I have absolutely no idea what's going on here. I speak math, and you just asked me to do something that is outside of the language of math. I am going to either crash so I don't do anything stupid, return a reserved value that explicitly indicates that the answer does not exist, or jump out a level, throwing a runtime exception (as appropriate for the given language), and let YOU tell me what to do now. It has to be this way because there is never a single answer that always holds true about what a computer should do when encountering this.

This should be hammered into you first in precalc, and again in any first-semester intro to computer science course, and again in discrete structures, and again in a computer hardware course. This is the reason for a lot of the hostility for asking this question.

Comment: Re:x/0 does not equal 0. (Score 4, Insightful) 1064 1064

by Verdatum (#49939577) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's the Harm In a Default Setting For Div By Zero?
No, it does not equal infinity.

The Limit as x aproaches 0+ of a/x = infinity.

But the Limit as x approaches 0- of a/x = negative infinity.

because this represents a jump-discontinuity, the value of a/0 is just plain undefined.

This is like week-1 of high school precalc shit. Come on.

Comment: Re:Morse Code (Score 1) 144 144

I'd presume that the device would translate the code into alphanumeric since the point of the article is having a replacement for a keyboard. In Morse code, there are two different kinds of breaks. there is the break between letters, and the break between words. A letter break is roughly the length of a dit, and a word break is roughly the length of a dah. (and a dah is the length of 3 dits). This means that space is just a letter like any other, and fairly efficient without the need of a special break key. On the contrary, having a break key would throw off your rhythm. When you learn Morse, you learn to subdivide like that. It's basically the same as being able to keep the beat when singing a song, it really isn't very difficult.

Fast coders use a device called a keyer. it has 2 paddles. One does a stream of dits, and the other does a solid tone (which you use to manually do dahs). You tune the speed of the stream of dits based on how quickly you can comfortably code.

The universe is like a safe to which there is a combination -- but the combination is locked up in the safe. -- Peter DeVries

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