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Comment: Re:Crazy idea, I know... (Score 1) 424

by Venerable Vegetable (#38167558) Attached to: Ubisoft Blames Piracy For Non-Release of PC Game

After installing the game you need to start it one time while being online to verify. Which shouldn't be a problem as you need to be online to download the game in the first place. After this you can always start it offline.

The game doesn't need to be fully patched. The second link you provide even specifically states that you can use offline mode if you do not want to patch your game.

Your steam client, not the game, must be updated to enable offline play. Which again is no issue as it only knows that there is a new version available if you have an internet connection anyway.

Comment: Re:moronic proposition (Score 3, Insightful) 427

by Venerable Vegetable (#36645396) Attached to: Calling BS On Unpaid Internships

In many countries it is illegal for (for profit) companies to employ volunteers. For example in the Netherlands volunteer work cannot be for profit, it cannot replace a paid job and it has to have a benefit to society. All volunteer work has to be registered. Other european countries have similar laws.

Comment: Re:Only One Half of the World Covered in This Map (Score 1) 150

by Venerable Vegetable (#33433010) Attached to: The Map of Critical Thinking and Modern Science

Metric:

"The map primarily includes modern scientists who have made significant advances to our understanding of the world, however I have also included many present day scientists who fuel a passion for, and advances in, science through communication and science popularisation"

Comment: Re:Also (Score 3, Informative) 168

by Venerable Vegetable (#32788458) Attached to: Information On Philips' "Coffee" Machine?

Translation from someone fluent in dutch but less so in english:

"Several times a day the museum atttendants performed (using a checklist) a systemetic check to find defective exhibitions, and believe me, they were there. They kept maintenance busy."

Anyway, the forum, while interesting for the stories and links, doesn't know where the thing is either. One poster even writes he contacted the museum and was told it was destroyed (sent to junkyard) but that comment is unsubstantiated.

Comment: Re:The question is still absurd... (Score 1) 1042

by Venerable Vegetable (#32515128) Attached to: 2 In 3 Misunderstand Gas Mileage; Here's Why

The easy answer would be the Yukon because it saves more per 10,000 miles. However, which one gets used more?

If you use the Civic much more than the Yukon it will still be better to replace it. (for example if you drive the Civic to work everyday and use the Yukon for weekly shopping and a yearly camping trip)

Additionally, the production cost of a SUV is probably higher so building a new SUV taxes the environment more than building a new sedan.

Comment: Re:Why is this news? (Score 5, Insightful) 325

by Venerable Vegetable (#32487992) Attached to: HP Gives Printers Email Addresses

I was thinking the same. Each printer (including the small desktop models) at my work can be emailed to and from, which works excellent with printing, scanning and faxing (receiving and sending). I've seen the same printers for sale at normal consumer shops...

If I understand correctly though, it will have a preconfigured, easy to set up web-based email adress om a HP server. Basically bringing the normal enterprise functionality to home users.

That would be fairly neat, but also rather useless and easy to abuse.

Comment: Re:Of course it can... (Score 1) 282

by Venerable Vegetable (#32474778) Attached to: Does the Internet Make Humanity Smarter Or Dumber?

Well, that's not really what the parent meant, but if you need a source, what about starting with the article?

"The cellular structure of the human brain, scientists have discovered, adapts readily to the tools we use, including those for finding, storing and sharing information. By changing our habits of mind, each new technology strengthens certain neural pathways and weakens others. The cellular alterations continue to shape the way we think even when we're not using the technology."

Comment: Re:And the moral is: (Score 2, Interesting) 525

by Venerable Vegetable (#32358890) Attached to: Sudden Demand For Logicians On Wall Street

If it gets to the point where you need weapons, relying on weapons for more than the last resort of defense would be a bad idea. Unless you're an action superhero, youd get killed sooner or later or live as a scavenger the rest of your life.

You'd need friends. Be part of the strongest gang/army/whatever. And have usefull skills, like farming, mechanics or teaching, so you don't actually have to take part in the shooting.

Comment: Re:How I faced my death (Score 1) 692

by Venerable Vegetable (#31725490) Attached to: Science Attempts To Explain Heaven

You've my sympathy for that awful experience.

I don't believe you're correct though with your statement that the brain has that much extra capacity. As I understand it a brain works by association. So when it receives signals which it associates with mortal danger, it will look for associated memories.

Basically you only think that you went through all that. Youll have a -memory- of thinking about everything you had done, but you didnt actually -think- about it. It is similar to doing an internet search and getting 10 million results. Even though you had that many results you will only really evaluate the highest rated results and in the end fully process one or two.

Additionally your brain plays a trick on you. When you recall the event it will bring up the memories while you "evaluate" them. But in fact that is the first time you really think about them. You're following the links that were created at the event, and the deep links, all the while thinking that you've thought about it before. Your brain does things like that all the time. A good example is your vision. Your eyes don't actually see everything youre `seeing. They only see a bit and your brain just extrapolates the rest, fooling you into thinking youre seeing the whole picture.

I hope that makes as much sense typed out as it does in my head. ;)

All the best

Comment: Because it adds a dimension (Score 1) 157

by Venerable Vegetable (#30493382) Attached to: 3D Blu-ray Spec Finalized, PS3 Supported

Well for starters, me. In fact I don't care to buy a blu-ray player at all. I'm happy with DVD's.

However, to get the ability to watch high quality 3d movies I'd buy a new player AND a new tv. And I would pay premium for comfortable glasses.

Why? Because it adds a lot to the movie experience. 3d produces a much more lifelike image.

Comment: Re:"We reserve the right" (Score 5, Informative) 643

by Venerable Vegetable (#30155556) Attached to: Vulgar Comment On Newspaper Site Costs Man His Job

Also following excerpts are from their privacy policy:

Our web servers automatically collect limited information about your computer's connection to the Internet, including your IP address (but not the e-mail address), when you visit our sites. Your IP address does not contain personally identifiable information, nor does it identify you personally.

We will not share individual user information with third parties unless the user has specifically approved the release of that information. In some cases, however, we may provide information to legal officials as described in “Compliance with Legal Process” below.

Comment: Re:Which is it? (Score 1) 140

I checked a can and it clearly states it cleans, lubricates and protects against rust. (among other things)

I do agree with you though that it's not really the best choice for all that. I mainly use it for loosening stuck bolts and parts.

But it does say so on the can.

When the weight of the paperwork equals the weight of the plane, the plane will fly. -- Donald Douglas

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