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Comment: Re:Blocking all blocked numbers (Score 1) 234

by Velcroman98 (#32987396) Attached to: When Telemarketers Harass Telecoms Companies
The company IT department could not/would not do anything like that - complete incompetance. Thank God the ELH system is farmed out. The PBX only serves to send callers after 5:00 to an old fashioned call center who pages the docs. Patients turn off the call block or don't get the returned call. If you want a more advanced system you can hope your insurance will allow you access to a more botique clinic. Generally everyone around here is served by one of two major health networks who copy each other.

Comment: Blocking all blocked numbers (Score 1) 234

by Velcroman98 (#32859906) Attached to: When Telemarketers Harass Telecoms Companies

A common answer I've been reading in here is to never answer or block ALL calls with their number blocked (because they are cowards). My wife is a physician, and has our home number blocked - because she is a coward. When returning pages/calls from patients there are a lot of those patients that would love to have our home number, so they could call day-and-night without having to go through the switchboard to get the actual physician on call. You won't get her to return a call until you turn your blocking off.

What if only residential people could get call number blocking, or if business had it taken away after a certain threshhold for complaints. Great idea (pat self on back), but the telcos would never give up the income from number blocking. Congress is too busy taking campaign contributions from corporations to ever give consituants any consideration in a matter such as this.

Cellphones

Android 2.1 Finally Makes It To Droid 132

Posted by timothy
from the for-all-your-robot-needs dept.
MrSmith0011000100110 writes "The lovely people over at AndroidCentral have broken the announcement that Android 2.1 is finally coming to the Motorola Droid, with actual proof on Verizon's Droid support page (PDF). I don't know about my Droid brethren, but I'm pretty excited to see the new series of Android ROMs for the Droid phone that are based on a stock Android 2.1. As most of us know, the existing 2.1 ROMs can be buggy as hell and either running vanilla 2.1 or a custom ROM; but this phone is still a tinkerer's best friend."
Privacy

Company Laptop, My Data — Can They Co-exist? 395

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-with-a-chore-schedule dept.
An anonymous reader writes "I recently replaced my old laptop. The owner of my company heard about this and offered to reimburse me for it, since he knows I have and will continue to do company work on my own hardware. I'd like the extra $1,250, but I think if I accept his offer that legally he has the right to any data on it (personal emails, files, blog posts, etc.). Even if I decide to put my personal stuff on a second drive, I'm worried that using company property to save and write to separate storage still gives them the right to it. The apps (Office, etc.) are my own licenses. We do not have a policy that intellectual property developed using company assets belongs to the company. But, if I figured out the One Great Internet Business Idea or write the Great American Novel and used the company laptop to do it, it's an avenue they could use to claim they own it. Unlikely, but scary. How many Slashdotters have been in this situation, and what agreement did you and your management come up with?"

Comment: The Arctic Circle Plan (Score 1) 88

by Velcroman98 (#29092277) Attached to: An Electricity-Cost-Aware Internet Routing Scheme
How about placing an outdated nuclear sub on the sea-bottom near the arctic circle instead of sinking old ship off the warm coasts for coral reefs. It would have to be gutted, then filled with servers and a way to pump glycol in-and-out for cooling, the glycol would be chilled by cool arctic waters. You'd have electricity for as long as the on-board nuclear plant still had fuel. If done off the northern coast of Alaska you'd only need to run a few short fiber links to land. There's plenty of military bases, so connections are established.

Comment: What is a Sex Offender in Illinois? (Score 2, Informative) 587

by Velcroman98 (#29047303) Attached to: Illinois Bans Social Network Use By Sex Offenders

I knew a gal in an apartment I lived in (in Phoenix) who once flashed er boobs to a couple of adult males (I missed 'em). The manager called the police and they charged her with a sex crime. I spoke with her about a year later, she was homeless and living on the street or with any guy that would let her stay. After the flashing and sex crime she was thrown out of the apartment. No other apartment in Phoenix would rent to her because of the crime free lease addendums.

How many other stories are there about people getting charged with a sex crime for taking a leak outside?

If this gets enforced strickly, how many people will have to log-off? Is Slashdot considered a social network site?

Upgrades

+ - Help Choosing 64-Bit Distro->

Submitted by
Velcroman98
Velcroman98 writes "I just maxed the RAM on my computer to 8GB. I'm currently running Vista x86, and I know it cannot take full advantage of all that memory. I'd like to buy a new TB HDD and partition it so I can install Win7 x64 Beta and later the RTM, but I'd also like to install a 64-bit Linux distribution to dual boot between it and Windows. What 64-bit Linux distribution would Slashdot readers suggest for this scenario?

My machine;
Dell Optiplex GX745
Core 2 Duo E6700
8GB RAM DDR2 8900
256MB ATI Radeon X1300PRO"

Link to Original Source
Government

+ - House Bill to Require Illegal Images Reported->

Submitted by
Velcroman98
Velcroman98 writes "The Securing Adolescents From Exploitation-Online (SAFE) Act

John Walsh of America's Most Wanted stood as the U.S. House of Representatives to overwhelmingly (409 to 2) approved a bill saying anyone offering an open Wi-Fi connection must report illegal images including "obscene" cartoons and drawings or be fined up to $300,000.

This Bill is aimed at individuals, coffee shops, libraries, hotels, social-networking sites, domain name registrars, and e-mail providers (anyone who provides "electronic communication service" or "remote computing service" to the public). SAFE also holds anyone who does comply is immune from civil lawsuits and criminal prosecutions. Any prognostications on unintended consequences of this Bill?

Full story on CNET News"

Link to Original Source

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