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Comment A similar problem described in the New Yorker (Score 1) 235 235

Two or three years ago the New Yorker ran an article about digitizing a large tapestry. As I remember the tapestry was laid out on a floor, and a high-resolution scanner was moved over it on a framework of some sort.

This took a while (days or weeks) and the fabric, responding to changes in temperature and moisture, would slightly moved between the times when different sections were digitized. Reconstructing the original appearance of the tapestry in the digitization became quite a problem

This seems to resemble your problem in several aspects.

The article describes how two mathematicians solved the problem.

Though it concentrated more on the human side of the issue than the technical, it still contained a few hints as to how they did it.

I'd suggest reading that article to see what you can glean. At the very least it can provide with some names to use either for a literature search or to contact directly.

A hint is that the tapestry featured a unicorn, and that word was probably in the title of the article.

If you have trouble locating it, try writing me.

Government

Submission + - HR-1955 or Why Free Speech on the Internet is Over

Univac_1004 writes: Congresswoman Jane Harman has introduced legislation — H.R. 1955: "Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism" — which starts: "The Internet has aided in facilitating violent radicalization, ideologically based violence, and the homegrown terrorism process in the United States by providing access to broad and constant streams of terrorist-related propaganda to United States citizens."

You can guess where it goes from there.

It got 404 votes in the house and a similar bill is likely to pass in the Senate.

Google for further information yourself, or start here: http://www.counterpunch.org/smith10252007.html >"The Politics of Paranoia"







(why the hell has /. ignored this?)
Announcements

Submission + - Would you Rather Cure Cancer or Burn Water?

Univac_1004 writes: John Kanzius, tried to desalinate seawater with a generator he developed to treat cancer, and it caused a flash in the test tube. Within days, he had the salt water in the test tube burning like a candle, as long as it was exposed to radio frequencies. The only problem was it eventually got hot enough to melt the test tube.

  • http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07252/815920-85.stm

Thus spake the master programmer: "Time for you to leave." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

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