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Comment: Not an advert, but... (Score 1) 347

by TwoScoopsOfPig (#29333527) Attached to: Running Old Desktops Headless?
... USB monitors exist. Small, not terribly effective for 3D rendering, but they work well for anything you'd be doing in an emergency like you described. Asus makes some, as does MIMO (and theirs are touch-capable, some with webcams). They're all run off of a single USB plug (two if your ports are underpowered) and have respectable resolutions.

Comment: Re:Yes. Well beyond reproach... (Score 1) 408

by TwoScoopsOfPig (#27636801) Attached to: What the Pirate Bay Verdict Could Mean For Google

Stop drinking the koolaid. AIG got a bailout because of their donations to key members of the government:

It was the set up for an analogy, jackass.

Besides, with AIG removed from the picture, the various contrived securities at the core of this would have even less basis for existence, all the companies tied up in this would be forced to pay out on their debts and financial institutions worldwide would be fucked royally, whether they bought these securities or not.

Yes AIG was a central player in fucking this up, but the method they used tied the whole fucking world to their sinking ship.

This is a global fucking market. You and the rest of your idiot isolationist brethren have yet to figure out that we Americans are no longer on an island with administrative duties for the world (and never should have been) - we have consequences that follow our actions.

So. While AIG does not deserve this for any reason, they still have a shitstorm to clean up. People say not to give the clean up responsibilities to the people who fucked it up. I say we treat them like the overgrown children they are and make them clean up their own mess - if we don't, the next companies to do this shit will feel completely invincible.

AIG's donations have zero to do with this. Why would we pay them back for screwing up? The total they donated ($330446) is a mere 0.000003888% of the $85 billion they received from the Fed. There is no way the donations were the root impetus for the rescue.

I know I want to give someone just over 257228 times the amount of money they give me, especially when they fuck up.<sarcasm />

Comment: Yes. Well beyond reproach... (Score 1) 408

by TwoScoopsOfPig (#27627303) Attached to: What the Pirate Bay Verdict Could Mean For Google
...if only because of its sheer size. Google:AIG::Pirate Bay:First National Bank of Podunk The little bank didn't get any of the bailout funds, but AIG, with a broader scope of services and more clout, did. Why? They are linchpins in the field. Prosecution there will show the flaw in the argument, and retroactive changes don't look good. So, all players know someone got screwed, and they move on. Either way, the big guy won't get screwed, because he'll fuck you back.

Comment: Re:Sticking my head in the lion's mouth here, but. (Score 1) 585

by TwoScoopsOfPig (#26861569) Attached to: Automation May Make Toll Roads More Common

Nothing you said contradicts anything I said.

You're right, nothing I said directly contradicts anything you said. Taken in the context of the parent comment, though, you are taking a contradictory position. The spirit of this argument is that sections of freeway between cities could be used as tollways which restricts travel. You're just saying that intra-city tollways exist on interstate freeway sections, which has nothing to do with the argument at hand.

Check your arguments. Do they make sense in the context of the problem at hand? If not, DON'T USE THEM. Instead, try making an argument that is clearly in the scope of the conversation.

Comment: Sticking my head in the lion's mouth here, but... (Score 1) 585

by TwoScoopsOfPig (#26857841) Attached to: Automation May Make Toll Roads More Common
... that was a typical, ill-conceived response. You have failed to understand the way the interstate system works.

Having worked in an engineering firm for some years, I can tell you that "interstate" almost never means what it says (I-45 only goes from Galveston to Dallas - at which point it becomes I-35/US-75 and splits off towards Oklahoma. Go figure). Also, major metropolitan areas are generally in control of the sections of interstate running through their respective jurisdictions. They receive little federal funding (if any) directly and instead rely on the state's highway budget.

As a result, the cities involved have total right to make those sections of freeway toll roads. They must fund their on repairs and maintenance and are given the leeway necessary to do that.

Next time you decide to make a retarded comment like that, think it through.
Media

+ - Nikko introduces R2-D2 entertainment droid

Submitted by mikael
mikael (484) writes "The register is reporting that a Japanese company Nikko is producing an integrated projector, DVD player, iPod connection, and media card reader, all combined into the shape of an R2-D2 robot. http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2007/07/25/r2-d2_mult imedia/ http://www.youtube.com/v/N1h6onXX0dM No mention if they are going to provide a C3PIO unit to serve cold drinks and popcorn."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Google exec bashes neckties

Submitted by MsManhattan
MsManhattan (1099313) writes "The necktie 'constricts circulation to the brain' and 'acts as decorative camouflage for the business suit, designed to shield the middle-aged male physique, with its shrinking shoulders and protruding paunch, from feeling sufficiently self-conscious to hit the gym,' wrote Google's global privacy counsel in a letter to the Financial Times. The exec, Peter Fleischer, was responding to an article in the paper's fashion section that advocated the tie as appropriate business attire. Fleischer suggested that the T-shirt is actually a better option in business, explaining: 'Wouldn't you like to know whether your business partners are fit? Why should you trust a man in business if he abuses his own body?' Casual attire, he added, could also lead to increased creativity."
Power

+ - For next April 1?->

Submitted by conlaw
conlaw (983784) writes "Amazing the things one serendipitously finds online. It may be too late for next April 1 but, OTH, some politicians are now urging that we build more nuclear plants to reduce the amounts of fossil fuels burned."
Link to Original Source
Displays

+ - What are the 10 best desktop wallpapers ever?

Submitted by Preacher Klaxon
Preacher Klaxon (666) writes "CNet.co.uk is asking readers to name the ten best desktop backgrounds of all time. To get things started though they've taken a look at some default wallpaper images, including the Macintosh System 1.1, Amiga Workbench 1.0, Windows 3.0, irix 5.0, QNX Neutrino and Ubuntu default desktop backgrounds. I'm not a huge fan of any default background image and tend to change it as soon as I install a new OS but I can't make my mind up about which ten wallpapers I would rate the highest. So what are the 10 best wallpapers of all time?"
Microsoft

Microsoft Wanted To Drop Mac Office To Hurt Apple 479

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the airing-the-dirty-laundry dept.
Overly Critical Guy writes to mention that more documents in the Iowa antitrust case have come out. This time, it's revealed that Microsoft considered dumping the Mac Office Suite entirely in a move to harm Apple. "The email complains at poor sales of Office, which it attributes to a lack of focus on making such sales among reps at that time. It describes dumping development of the product as: 'The strongest bargaining point we have, as doing so will do a great deal of harm to Apple immediately.' The document also confirms that Microsoft at the time saw Office for the Mac as a chance to test new features in the product before they appeared in Windows, 'because it is so much less critical to our business than Windows.'"
Media

+ - Anti-DRM Petition Response From Downing Street

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Downing Street have released a statement in response to a petition on their website.
It states that all products with DRM should be labelled on how the product can be used or not used.

It is clear though that the needs and rights of consumers must also be carefully safeguarded. It is reasonable for consumers to be informed what is actually being offered for sale, for example, and how and where the purchaser will be able to use the product, and any restrictions applied.

It also references the Gowers Report [PDF warning] published December 2006 and the recommendations proposed in the report.

Recommendations include introducing a limited private copying exception by 2008 for format shifting for works published after the date that the law comes into effect. There should be no accompanying levies for consumers. Also making it easier for users to file notice of complaints procedures relating to Digital Rights Management tools by providing an accessible web interface on the Patent Office website by 2008 and that DTI should investigate the possibility of providing consumer guidance on DRM systems through a labelling convention without imposing unnecessary regulatory burdens
"

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